Age Differences in Speech Motor Performance on a Novel Speech Task PurposeThe study was aimed at characterizing age-related changes in speech motor performance on a nonword repetition task as a function of practice and nonword length and complexity.MethodNonword repetition accuracy, lip aperture coordination, and nonword production durations were assessed on 2 consecutive days for 16 young and 16 elderly participants for ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2013
Age Differences in Speech Motor Performance on a Novel Speech Task
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Neeraja Sadagopan
    University of Colorado, Boulder
  • Anne Smith
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Correspondence to Neeraja Sadagopan: Neeraja.Sadagopan@colorado.edu
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Liss
    Associate Editor: Julie Liss×
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   October 01, 2013
Age Differences in Speech Motor Performance on a Novel Speech Task
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2013, Vol. 56, 1552-1566. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/12-0293)
History: Received September 10, 2012 , Revised February 22, 2013 , Accepted February 26, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2013, Vol. 56, 1552-1566. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/12-0293)
History: Received September 10, 2012; Revised February 22, 2013; Accepted February 26, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 13

PurposeThe study was aimed at characterizing age-related changes in speech motor performance on a nonword repetition task as a function of practice and nonword length and complexity.

MethodNonword repetition accuracy, lip aperture coordination, and nonword production durations were assessed on 2 consecutive days for 16 young and 16 elderly participants for the production of 6 novel nonwords increasing in length and complexity.

ResultsThe effect of age on the ability to accurately and rapidly repeat long, complex nonwords was significant. However, the authors found no differences between the speech motor coordinative patterns of young and elderly adults. Further, the authors demonstrated age- and nonword-specific within- and between-session gains in speech motor performance.

ConclusionsThe authors speculate that cognitive, sensory, and motor factors interact in complex ways in elderly individuals to produce individual differences in nonword repetition ability at the levels of both behavioral and speech motor performance.

Acknowledgments
This article is based on a dissertation submitted by the first author in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences from Purdue University, West Lafayette, LA. We would like to acknowledge the input of Jessica Huber, Chris Weber-Fox, and Howard Zelaznik. We are grateful to Janna Berlin and Jayanthi Sasisekaran for their help with data collection. Portions of these data were previously presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's Annual Convention in New Orleans, LA (November 2009), and at the Fifteenth Biennial International Conference on Motor Speech in Savannah, GA (March 2010).
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