A Comparison of Methods for Decoupling Tongue and Lower Lip From Jaw Movements in 3D Articulography PurposeOne popular method to study the motion of oral articulators is 3D electromagnetic articulography. For many studies, it is important to use an algorithm to decouple the motion of the tongue and the lower lip from the motion of the mandible. In this article, the authors describe and compare 4 ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2013
A Comparison of Methods for Decoupling Tongue and Lower Lip From Jaw Movements in 3D Articulography
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rafael Neto Henriques
    University of Lisbon, Portugal
  • Pascal van Lieshout
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Correspondence to Rafael Neto Henriques: rafaelnh21@gmail.com
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Kate Bunton
    Associate Editor: Kate Bunton×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   October 01, 2013
A Comparison of Methods for Decoupling Tongue and Lower Lip From Jaw Movements in 3D Articulography
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2013, Vol. 56, 1503-1516. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/12-0016)
History: Received January 10, 2012 , Revised June 15, 2012 , Accepted February 1, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2013, Vol. 56, 1503-1516. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/12-0016)
History: Received January 10, 2012; Revised June 15, 2012; Accepted February 1, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9

PurposeOne popular method to study the motion of oral articulators is 3D electromagnetic articulography. For many studies, it is important to use an algorithm to decouple the motion of the tongue and the lower lip from the motion of the mandible. In this article, the authors describe and compare 4 methods for decoupling jaw motion by using 3D tongue and lower lip data.

MethodA 3D position estimation method (3DPE), an adapted version of the estimated rotation method (ERM) proposed by Westbury, Lindstrom, and McClean (2002)  for 3D recordings, a linear subtraction method, and a new method called Jaw and Oral Analysis (JOANA) were evaluated with data recorded from sensors attached to the lower molars, lower lip, and tongue.

ResultsThe 3DPE method showed the fewest errors. However, unlike the other methods, it requires more than one sensor attached to the lower jaw. Among the single-sensor methods, JOANA was found to be the most comparable to 3DPE.

ConclusionThe findings suggest that JOANA is efficient in decoupling tongue and lower lip motion from jaw motion, whereas ERM, with its less complicated procedure for attaching the lower jaw incisor sensor, can be considered a viable alternative.

Acknowledgments
We would like to thank the Reitoria da Universidade de Lisboa/Fundação Amadeu Dias, the Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, and the BPI bank for providing the initial funds for this study. Part of this project was made possible by funding provided by the Canada Research Chairs Program awarded to the second author. We would also like to thank Professor Eduardo Ducla-Soares for the support given and Konstantin Naumenko and Christopher Neufeld for their help in data acquisition. Finally, a special thanks to Simon Strangeways for his dedication in creating the skull model for the figures shown in this article.
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