Unscheduled Telephone Calls to Measure Percent Syllables Stuttered During Clinical Trials PurposeResearchers have used unscheduled telephone calls for many years during clinical trials to measure adult stuttering severity before and after treatment. Because variability is a hallmark of stuttering severity with adults, it is questionable whether an unscheduled telephone call is truly representative of their everyday speech.MethodThe authors studied the speech ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2013
Unscheduled Telephone Calls to Measure Percent Syllables Stuttered During Clinical Trials
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hamid Karimi
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney
  • Sue O'Brian
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney
  • Mark Onslow
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney
  • Mark Jones
    The University of Queensland, Australia
  • Ross Menzies
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney
  • Ann Packman
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney
  • Correspondence to Mark Onslow: mark.onslow@sydney.edu.au
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Katherine Hustad
    Associate Editor: Katherine Hustad×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   October 01, 2013
Unscheduled Telephone Calls to Measure Percent Syllables Stuttered During Clinical Trials
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2013, Vol. 56, 1455-1461. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/12-0264)
History: Received August 21, 2012 , Revised December 17, 2012 , Accepted January 14, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2013, Vol. 56, 1455-1461. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/12-0264)
History: Received August 21, 2012; Revised December 17, 2012; Accepted January 14, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

PurposeResearchers have used unscheduled telephone calls for many years during clinical trials to measure adult stuttering severity before and after treatment. Because variability is a hallmark of stuttering severity with adults, it is questionable whether an unscheduled telephone call is truly representative of their everyday speech.

MethodThe authors studied the speech of 9 men and 1 woman for a 12-hr day during different speaking activities. On that day and 1 week prior to that day, participants received an unscheduled 10-min telephone call from a person unknown to them. The authors compared the percent syllables stuttered (%SS) for the unscheduled telephone call on the day to the %SS of the unscheduled telephone call 1 week prior to the day and to the %SS during the entire day.

ResultsNo significant differences were found, and all confidence intervals with t tests included 0. The concordance correlation test also showed a strong positive correlation between %SS scores for the entire day and for the unscheduled 10-min telephone call.

ConclusionThe authors conclude that there is no reason to doubt that 10-min unscheduled telephone calls are a representative speech sample for %SS during clinical trials of stuttering treatments.

Acknowledgment
This research was supported by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Program Grant 633007.
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