Listeners' Attitudes Toward Children With Voice Problems PurposeTo investigate the attitudes of school teachers toward children with voice problems in a Chinese population.MethodThree groups of listeners participated in this study: primary school teachers, speech-language pathology students, and general university students. The participants were required to make attitude judgments on 12 voice samples using a semantic differential scale ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2013
Listeners' Attitudes Toward Children With Voice Problems
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Estella P.-M. Ma
    Voice Research Laboratory, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, SAR, People's Republic of China
  • Camille H.-Y. Yu
    Voice Research Laboratory, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, SAR, People's Republic of China
  • Correspondence to Estella P.-M. Ma: estella.ma@hku.hk
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Bruce Gerratt
    Associate Editor: Bruce Gerratt×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   October 01, 2013
Listeners' Attitudes Toward Children With Voice Problems
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2013, Vol. 56, 1409-1415. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/11-0242)
History: Received September 1, 2011 , Revised April 20, 2012 , Accepted January 7, 2013
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2013, Vol. 56, 1409-1415. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/11-0242)
History: Received September 1, 2011; Revised April 20, 2012; Accepted January 7, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

PurposeTo investigate the attitudes of school teachers toward children with voice problems in a Chinese population.

MethodThree groups of listeners participated in this study: primary school teachers, speech-language pathology students, and general university students. The participants were required to make attitude judgments on 12 voice samples using a semantic differential scale with 22 bipolar adjective pairs. The voice samples were collected from 6 children with healthy voices and 6 children with dysphonia. The 22 bipolar adjective pairs were intended to cover nonspeech characteristics about the child's personality, social characteristics, and physical appearance.

ResultsThe mean attitude ratings received by children with dysphonic voice were significantly lower (i.e., less favorable) than those received by children with healthy voices in all of the 22 adjective pairs (all ps < .002). The attitude ratings made by the 3 groups of listeners were not significantly different from one another (ps > .05).

ConclusionTo our knowledge, this is the first study in which the authors examine listeners' perception toward children with voice problems in the Chinese population. The results suggest that voice problems in children warrant attention, and their effects on the child should not be underestimated. The findings also highlight the importance of early identification and intervention for children with voice problems.

Acknowledgment
A preliminary version of this article was presented at the 8th Pan-European Voice Conference, Dresden, Germany, August 2008.
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