A Theoretical Account of Lexical and Semantic Naming Deficits in Bilingual Aphasia PurposeThe purpose of this study was to examine premorbid language proficiency and lexical and semantic processing deficits in bilingual aphasia and develop a theoretical account of bilingual language processing.MethodNineteen Spanish–English patients with bilingual aphasia completed a language use questionnaire (LUQ) and were administered Spanish and English standardized language assessments. The ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2013
A Theoretical Account of Lexical and Semantic Naming Deficits in Bilingual Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Teresa Gray
    Boston University
  • Swathi Kiran
    Boston University
  • Correspondence to Teresa Gray: tgray@bu.edu
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Margaret Blake
    Associate Editor: Margaret Blake×
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language
Article   |   August 01, 2013
A Theoretical Account of Lexical and Semantic Naming Deficits in Bilingual Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2013, Vol. 56, 1314-1327. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0091)
History: Received March 21, 2012 , Revised July 23, 2012 , Accepted December 21, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2013, Vol. 56, 1314-1327. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0091)
History: Received March 21, 2012; Revised July 23, 2012; Accepted December 21, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

PurposeThe purpose of this study was to examine premorbid language proficiency and lexical and semantic processing deficits in bilingual aphasia and develop a theoretical account of bilingual language processing.

MethodNineteen Spanish–English patients with bilingual aphasia completed a language use questionnaire (LUQ) and were administered Spanish and English standardized language assessments. The authors analyzed the data to (a) identify patterns of lexical and semantic processing deficits and conceptualize a theoretical framework that accounts for language deficits, (b) determine LUQ measures that predict poststroke language deficits, and (c) evaluate the relationship between predictive LUQ measures and poststroke language deficits in order to identify impairment patterns.

ResultsOn the basis of the results, the authors obtained significant correlations on several measures between language input and output. They identified prestroke language ability rating as the strongest predictor of poststroke outcomes. On the basis of these data, 2 distinct groups were identified: (a) patients who lost the same amount of language in Spanish and English and (b) patients who lost different amounts of Spanish and English.

ConclusionsThese findings suggest that it is possible to identify relationships between language patterns and deficits in patients with bilingual aphasia and that these trends will be instrumental in clinical assessments of this understudied population.

Acknowledgments
A portion of this research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R21DC009446 and a Clinical Research Grant from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation awarded to the second author. We thank the patients and their families for their time and participation in this study. We also extend our gratitude to the members of the Aphasia Research Laboratory for their steadfast support and invaluable feedback.
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