Factors That Influence Fast Mapping in Children Exposed to Spanish and English PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine whether children exposed to 2 languages would benefit from the phonotactic probability cues of a single language in the same way as monolingual peers and to determine whether crosslinguistic influence would be present in a fast-mapping task.MethodTwo groups of typically developing children ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2013
Factors That Influence Fast Mapping in Children Exposed to Spanish and English
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary Alt
    University of Arizona
  • Christina Meyers
    University of Arizona
  • Cecilia Figueroa
    University of Arizona
  • Correspondence to Mary Alt: malt@email.arizona.edu
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Nina Capone-Singleton
    Associate Editor: Nina Capone-Singleton×
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language
Article   |   August 01, 2013
Factors That Influence Fast Mapping in Children Exposed to Spanish and English
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2013, Vol. 56, 1237-1248. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0092)
History: Received April 12, 2011 , Revised September 20, 2011 , Accepted December 7, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2013, Vol. 56, 1237-1248. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0092)
History: Received April 12, 2011; Revised September 20, 2011; Accepted December 7, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine whether children exposed to 2 languages would benefit from the phonotactic probability cues of a single language in the same way as monolingual peers and to determine whether crosslinguistic influence would be present in a fast-mapping task.

MethodTwo groups of typically developing children (monolingual English and bilingual Spanish-English) took part in a computer-based fast-mapping task that manipulated phonotactic probability. Children were preschool-aged (N = 50) or school-aged (N = 34). Fast mapping was assessed through name-identification and naming tasks. Data were analyzed using mixed analyses of variance with post hoc testing and simple regression.

ResultsBilingual and monolingual preschoolers showed sensitivity to English phonotactic cues in both tasks, but bilingual preschoolers were less accurate than monolingual peers in the naming task. School-aged bilingual children had nearly identical performance to monolingual peers.

ConclusionKnowing that children exposed to two languages can benefit from the statistical cues of a single language can help inform ideas about instruction and assessment for bilingual learners.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by a Faculty Small Grant from the University of Arizona Foundation awarded to the first author and support from the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Institutional Research Training Grant T32DC009398 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders for the second and third authors. We thank Leah Fabiano-Smith for her thoughtful review of an earlier draft of this article. We are grateful for the participation of all the children who took part in this study as well as their parents and teachers who supported them. We also thank several generations of L4 Lab members for their tireless efforts. ¡Viva la rana!
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