Relation of Perceived Breathiness to Laryngeal Kinematics and Acoustic Measures Based on Computational Modeling PurposeIn this study, the authors sought to determine (a) how specific vocal fold structural and vibratory features relate to breathy voice quality and (b) the relation of perceived breathiness to 4 acoustic correlates of breathiness.MethodA computational, kinematic model of the vocal fold medial surfaces was used to specify features of ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2013
Relation of Perceived Breathiness to Laryngeal Kinematics and Acoustic Measures Based on Computational Modeling
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robin A. Samlan
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Brad H. Story
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Kate Bunton
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Correspondence to Robin A. Samlan: rsamlan@email.arizona.edu
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Zhaoyan Zhang
    Associate Editor: Zhaoyan Zhang×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   August 01, 2013
Relation of Perceived Breathiness to Laryngeal Kinematics and Acoustic Measures Based on Computational Modeling
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2013, Vol. 56, 1209-1223. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0194)
History: Received June 21, 2012 , Revised November 8, 2012 , Accepted December 19, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2013, Vol. 56, 1209-1223. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0194)
History: Received June 21, 2012; Revised November 8, 2012; Accepted December 19, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

PurposeIn this study, the authors sought to determine (a) how specific vocal fold structural and vibratory features relate to breathy voice quality and (b) the relation of perceived breathiness to 4 acoustic correlates of breathiness.

MethodA computational, kinematic model of the vocal fold medial surfaces was used to specify features of vocal fold structure and vibration in a manner consistent with breathy voice. Four model parameters were altered: vocal process separation, surface bulging, vibratory nodal point, and epilaryngeal constriction. Twelve naïve listeners rated breathiness of 364 samples relative to a reference. The degree of breathiness was then compared to (a) the underlying kinematic profile and (b) 4 acoustic measures: cepstral peak prominence (CPP), harmonics-to-noise ratio, and two measures of spectral slope.

ResultsVocal process separation alone accounted for 61.4% of the variance in perceptual rating. Adding nodal point ratio and bulging to the equation increased the explained variance to 88.7%. The acoustic measure CPP accounted for 86.7% of the variance in perceived breathiness, and explained variance increased to 92.6% with the addition of one spectral slope measure.

ConclusionBreathiness ratings were best explained kinematically by the degree of vocal process separation and acoustically by CPP.

Acknowledgments
Parts of this research were supported by National Institutes of Health Grants R01-DC04789 and F31-DC011201. We would like to acknowledge Mark Borgstrom's contributions to the statistical analysis.
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