The Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB): Item Bank Calibration and Development of a Disorder-Generic Short Form PurposeThe purpose of this study was to calibrate the items for the Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB; Baylor, Yorkston, Eadie, Miller, & Amtmann, 2009; Yorkston et al., 2008) using item response theory (IRT). One overriding objective was to examine whether the IRT item parameters would be consistent across different diagnostic ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2013
The Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB): Item Bank Calibration and Development of a Disorder-Generic Short Form
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carolyn Baylor
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Kathryn Yorkston
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Tanya Eadie
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Jiseon Kim
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Hyewon Chung
    Chungnam National University, Daejeon, South Korea
  • Dagmar Amtmann
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Correspondence to Carolyn Baylor: cbaylor@u.washington.edu
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Liss
    Associate Editor: Julie Liss×
Article Information
Special Populations / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Speech
Article   |   August 01, 2013
The Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB): Item Bank Calibration and Development of a Disorder-Generic Short Form
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2013, Vol. 56, 1190-1208. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0140)
History: Received April 24, 2012 , Revised October 10, 2012 , Accepted December 14, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2013, Vol. 56, 1190-1208. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0140)
History: Received April 24, 2012; Revised October 10, 2012; Accepted December 14, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 39

PurposeThe purpose of this study was to calibrate the items for the Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB; Baylor, Yorkston, Eadie, Miller, & Amtmann, 2009; Yorkston et al., 2008) using item response theory (IRT). One overriding objective was to examine whether the IRT item parameters would be consistent across different diagnostic groups, thereby allowing creation of a disorder-generic instrument. The intended outcomes were the final item bank and a short form ready for clinical and research applications.

MethodSelf-report data were collected from 701 individuals representing 4 diagnoses: multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and head and neck cancer. Participants completed the CPIB and additional self-report questionnaires. CPIB data were analyzed using the IRT graded response model.

ResultsThe initial set of 94 candidate CPIB items were reduced to an item bank of 46 items demonstrating unidimensionality, local independence, good item fit, and good measurement precision. Differential item functioning analyses detected no meaningful differences across diagnostic groups. A 10-item, disorder-generic short form was generated.

ConclusionsThe CPIB provides speech-language pathologists with a unidimensional, self-report outcomes measurement instrument dedicated to the construct of communicative participation. This instrument may be useful to clinicians and researchers wanting to implement measures of communicative participation in their work.

Acknowledgments
This study was made possible by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant 1R03DC010044 (principal investigator: Carolyn Baylor) and National Cancer Institute Grant 1R03CA132525-01A1 (principal investigator: Tanya Eadie). We thank all of our participants who gave their time and energy to complete the questionnaires. We also thank all of the individuals who helped us recruit participants, including SLPs and other health care providers, staff at the research and education organizations serving the groups represented, and volunteer support group leaders who shared information about the study with clients and group members. Finally, we thank our student research assistants for their efforts in data collection and data entry, including Christina Gray, Brittney Skrupky, Devon Sawin, Kristin Lamvik, Kathy Nagle, and Tiffany Elliott.
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