Perceptual Development of Nasal Consonants in Children With Normal Hearing and in Children Who Use Cochlear Implants PurposeThis study was conducted to determine whether the perceptions of nasal consonants in children with normal hearing and children with cochlear implants were predicted by the discontinuity hypothesis.MethodsFour groups participated: 8 adults, 8 children with normal hearing (ages 5–7 years), 8 children with normal hearing (ages 3.5–4 years), and 5 ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2013
Perceptual Development of Nasal Consonants in Children With Normal Hearing and in Children Who Use Cochlear Implants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathryn M. Guillot
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Ralph N. Ohde
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Mark Hedrick
    University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis
  • Correspondence to Kathryn M. Guillot: kathryn.m.guillot@vanderbilt.edu
  • Editor: Craig Champlin
    Editor: Craig Champlin×
  • Associate Editor: Emily Tobey
    Associate Editor: Emily Tobey×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing
Article   |   August 01, 2013
Perceptual Development of Nasal Consonants in Children With Normal Hearing and in Children Who Use Cochlear Implants
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2013, Vol. 56, 1133-1143. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0082)
History: Received March 16, 2012 , Revised October 11, 2012 , Accepted December 9, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2013, Vol. 56, 1133-1143. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0082)
History: Received March 16, 2012; Revised October 11, 2012; Accepted December 9, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

PurposeThis study was conducted to determine whether the perceptions of nasal consonants in children with normal hearing and children with cochlear implants were predicted by the discontinuity hypothesis.

MethodsFour groups participated: 8 adults, 8 children with normal hearing (ages 5–7 years), 8 children with normal hearing (ages 3.5–4 years), and 5 children with cochlear implants (ages 5–7 years). Stimuli were 128 nasal consonant + vowel (/m/ /n/ + /i/ /æ/ /u/ /ɑ/) syllables produced by a male adult. Each syllable production was edited into 4 segment types: (a) 50-ms murmur, (b) 25-ms murmur + 25-ms transition, (c) 50-ms transition, and (d) full syllable.

ResultsDevelopmental effects were observed across listener groups. The children performed better in the 25-ms murmur + 25-ms transition condition, which suggests that they benefit from an integrated perceptual cue. The children wearing cochlear implants performed poorer than children with normal hearing on all segments.

ConclusionsDevelopmental differences in perception of nasal consonants were evident. Children wearing cochlear implants showed weaker integration and perception abilities compared to younger children with normal hearing. As predicted by the discontinuity hypothesis, the segment with the spectral discontinuity provided the strongest perceptual cues to place of articulation of nasals in children with normal hearing.

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