Roles of Voice Onset Time and F0 in Stop Consonant Voicing Perception: Effects of Masking Noise and Low-Pass Filtering PurposeThe contributions of voice onset time (VOT) and fundamental frequency (F0) were evaluated for the perception of voicing in syllable-initial stop consonants in words that were low-pass filtered and/or masked by speech-shaped noise. It was expected that listeners would rely less on VOT and more on F0 in these degraded ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2013
Roles of Voice Onset Time and F0 in Stop Consonant Voicing Perception: Effects of Masking Noise and Low-Pass Filtering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Matthew B. Winn
    University of Maryland, College Park
  • Monita Chatterjee
    University of Maryland, College Park
  • William J. Idsardi
    University of Maryland, College Park
  • Correspondence to Matthew B. Winn, who is now at the University of Wisconsin—Madison: mwinn83@gmail.com
  • Monita Chatterjee is now at the Boystown National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE.
    Monita Chatterjee is now at the Boystown National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE.×
  • Editor: Sid Bacon
    Editor: Sid Bacon×
  • Associate Editor: Marjorie Leek
    Associate Editor: Marjorie Leek×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing
Article   |   August 01, 2013
Roles of Voice Onset Time and F0 in Stop Consonant Voicing Perception: Effects of Masking Noise and Low-Pass Filtering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2013, Vol. 56, 1097-1107. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0086)
History: Received March 18, 2012 , Revised August 30, 2012 , Accepted December 28, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2013, Vol. 56, 1097-1107. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0086)
History: Received March 18, 2012; Revised August 30, 2012; Accepted December 28, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

PurposeThe contributions of voice onset time (VOT) and fundamental frequency (F0) were evaluated for the perception of voicing in syllable-initial stop consonants in words that were low-pass filtered and/or masked by speech-shaped noise. It was expected that listeners would rely less on VOT and more on F0 in these degraded conditions.

MethodTwenty young listeners with normal hearing identified modified natural speech tokens that varied by VOT and F0 in several conditions of low-pass filtering and masking noise. Stimuli included /b/–/p/ and /d/–/t/ continua that were presented in separate blocks. Identification results were modeled using mixed-effects logistic regression.

ResultsWhen speech was filtered and/or masked by noise, listeners' voicing perceptions were driven less by VOT and more by F0. Speech-shaped masking noise exerted greater effects on the /b/–/p/ contrast, while low-pass filtering exerted greater effects on the /d/–/t/ contrast, consistent with the acoustics of these contrasts.

ConclusionListeners can adjust their use of acoustic-phonetic cues in a dynamic way that is appropriate for challenging listening conditions; cues that are less influential in ideal conditions can gain priority in challenging conditions.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institutes of Health (NIH) Grants R01 DC 004786 (awarded to Monita Chatterjee) and 7R01DC005660-07 (awarded to David Poeppel and William J. Idsardi). Matthew B. Winn was supported by the University of Maryland Center for Comparative and Evolutionary Biology of Hearing Training Grant (NIH Grant T32 DC000046-17; principal investigator Arthur N. Popper). We are grateful to Ewan Dunbar for his assistance with the statistical analysis.
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