Auditory Temporal-Organization Abilities in School-Age Children With Peripheral Hearing Loss PurposeThe objective was to assess auditory sequential organization (ASO) ability in children with and without hearing loss.MethodForty children 9 to 12 years old participated in the study: 12 with sensory hearing loss (HL), 12 with central auditory processing disorder (CAPD), and 16 with normal hearing. They performed an ASO task ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2013
Auditory Temporal-Organization Abilities in School-Age Children With Peripheral Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amineh Koravand
    Université de Montréal and CHU Sainte-Justine, Montréal, Québec, Canada
  • Benoît Jutras
    Université de Montréal and CHU Sainte-Justine, Montréal, Québec, Canada
  • Correspondence to Amineh Koravand, who is now at the University of Ottawa: amineh.koravand@uottawa.ca
  • Editor: Sid Bacon
    Editor: Sid Bacon×
  • Associate Editor: Dennis McFarland
    Associate Editor: Dennis McFarland×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing
Article   |   August 01, 2013
Auditory Temporal-Organization Abilities in School-Age Children With Peripheral Hearing Loss
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2013, Vol. 56, 1065-1074. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0233)
History: Received August 21, 2011 , Revised March 30, 2012 , Accepted November 1, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2013, Vol. 56, 1065-1074. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0233)
History: Received August 21, 2011; Revised March 30, 2012; Accepted November 1, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

PurposeThe objective was to assess auditory sequential organization (ASO) ability in children with and without hearing loss.

MethodForty children 9 to 12 years old participated in the study: 12 with sensory hearing loss (HL), 12 with central auditory processing disorder (CAPD), and 16 with normal hearing. They performed an ASO task in which they were asked to recall 2, 3, and 5 verbal and nonverbal stimuli with an interstimulus interval (ISI) of 425 ms as well as sequences of 2 elements with an ISI of 20 or 1,000 ms.

ResultsNo significant difference was found between the group of children with HL and the 2 other groups on nonverbal stimuli in all testing conditions. Regardless of ISI duration or number of elements in the sequence, children with HL had significantly fewer correct responses than children with normal hearing and children with CAPD for the verbal stimuli /ba/–/da/. Children with HL had significantly better performance than children with CAPD for the verbal a/–/da/ when the number of elements in the sequence varied.

ConclusionsChildren with sensory HL showed impaired ASO ability when recalling verbal /ba/–/da/. Results suggest that hearing loss can induce a specific signature when processing these verbal stimuli.

Acknowledgments
The first author is grateful to the Fonds de la recherche en santé du Québec and the Research Centre of CHU Sainte-Justine for financial support through scholarships. This research was funded in part by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Réseau provincial de recherche en adaptation-réadaptation, the Research Centre of CHU Sainte-Justine, and the Hearing Foundation of Canada. We are grateful to the children and their parents, who invested considerable time and effort to participate in this research project. We are also very grateful to Marie-Michèle Béliveau for her assistance in the various project phases.
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