Behavioral Stuttering Interventions for Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis PurposeTo evaluate the effectiveness of behavioral interventions designed to treat stuttering in children.MethodStudies were included for review if (a) the treatment was a behavioral intervention, (b) participants were between 2 and 18 years old, (c) the design was an experimental or quasi-experimental group design, and (d) the reported outcome measure ... Review
Review  |   June 01, 2013
Behavioral Stuttering Interventions for Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Chad Nye
    University of Central Florida, Orlando
  • Martine Vanryckeghem
    University of Central Florida, Orlando
  • Jamie B. Schwartz
    University of Central Florida, Orlando
  • Carl Herder
    American Institute for Stuttering, New York, NY
  • Herbert M. Turner, III
    Analytica, Phoenixville, PA
  • Courtney Howard
    Advantage Therapy, Springfield, MO
  • Correspondence to Chad Nye: chad.nye@ucf.edu
  • Courtney Howard is now with Sunbelt Staffing, Tampa, FL.
    Courtney Howard is now with Sunbelt Staffing, Tampa, FL.×
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt
    Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech
Review   |   June 01, 2013
Behavioral Stuttering Interventions for Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2013, Vol. 56, 921-932. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0036)
History: Received January 31, 2012 , Revised May 10, 2012 , Accepted October 9, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2013, Vol. 56, 921-932. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0036)
History: Received January 31, 2012; Revised May 10, 2012; Accepted October 9, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9

PurposeTo evaluate the effectiveness of behavioral interventions designed to treat stuttering in children.

MethodStudies were included for review if (a) the treatment was a behavioral intervention, (b) participants were between 2 and 18 years old, (c) the design was an experimental or quasi-experimental group design, and (d) the reported outcome measure assessed stuttering.An electronic search of 8 databases yielded a total of 9 studies, representing 327 treated participants across 7 different intervention types. Data were extracted for participant, treatment, and outcome characteristics as well as for methodological quality.

ResultsAn analysis of the treatment effects yielded significant positive effects approaching 1 SD when compared with a nontreatment control group. No significant differences emerged for studies comparing 2 different treatments.

ConclusionConclusions drawn from the extant research suggest that data to support the efficacy of behavioral intervention in children exists for a limited number of intervention strategies, based on a meager number of methodologically acceptable studies.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access