A Biomechanical Modeling Study of the Effects of the Orbicularis Oris Muscle and Jaw Posture on Lip Shape PurposeThe authors' general aim is to use biomechanical models of speech articulators to explore how possible variations in anatomical structure contribute to differences in articulatory strategies and phone systems across human populations. Specifically, they investigated 2 issues: (a) the link between lip muscle anatomy and variability in lip gestures and ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2013
A Biomechanical Modeling Study of the Effects of the Orbicularis Oris Muscle and Jaw Posture on Lip Shape
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ian Stavness
    University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
  • Mohammad Ali Nazari
    Stendhal University and Grenoble University of Technology, Grenoble, France
  • Pascal Perrier
    Stendhal University and Grenoble University of Technology, Grenoble, France
  • Didier Demolin
    Stendhal University and Grenoble University of Technology, Grenoble, France
  • Yohan Payan
    Joseph Fourier University, La Tronche, France
  • Correspondence to Ian Stavness: stavness@gmail.com
  • Editor: Jody Kreiman
    Editor: Jody Kreiman×
  • Associate Editor: Kate Bunton
    Associate Editor: Kate Bunton×
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   June 01, 2013
A Biomechanical Modeling Study of the Effects of the Orbicularis Oris Muscle and Jaw Posture on Lip Shape
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2013, Vol. 56, 878-890. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0200)
History: Received June 25, 2012 , Accepted October 15, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2013, Vol. 56, 878-890. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0200)
History: Received June 25, 2012; Accepted October 15, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

PurposeThe authors' general aim is to use biomechanical models of speech articulators to explore how possible variations in anatomical structure contribute to differences in articulatory strategies and phone systems across human populations. Specifically, they investigated 2 issues: (a) the link between lip muscle anatomy and variability in lip gestures and (b) the constraints of coupled lip/jaw biomechanics on jaw posture in labial sounds.

MethodThe authors used a model coupling the jaw, tongue, and face. First, the influence of the orbicularis oris (OO) anatomical implementation was analyzed by assessing how changes in depth (from epidermis to the skull) and peripheralness (proximity to the lip horn center) affected lip shaping. Second, the capability of the lip/jaw system to generate protrusion and rounding, or labial closure, was evaluated for different jaw heights.

ResultsResults showed that a peripheral and moderately deep OO implementation is most appropriate for protrusion and rounding; a superficial implementation facilitates closure; protrusion and rounding require a high jaw position; and closure is achievable for various jaw heights.

ConclusionsModels provide objective information regarding possible links between anatomical and speech production variability across humans. Comparisons with experimental data will illustrate how motor control and cultural factors cope with these constraints.

Acknowledgments
This work was partly supported by the French Agànce Nationale de la Recherche (Project SKULLSPEECH, ANR-08-BLAN-0272). We thank the ArtiSynth team at the University of British Columbia for making the simulation software available and Pierre Badin at Gipsa-lab for providing the CT data used to adapt the model, as well as for Figure 2.
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