Intervention Efficacy and Intensity for Children With Speech Sound Disorder PurposeClinicians do not have an evidence base they can use to recommend optimum intervention intensity for preschool children who present with speech sound disorder (SSD). This study examined the effect of dose frequency on phonological performance and the efficacy of the multiple oppositions approach.MethodFifty-four preschool children with SSD were randomly ... Article
Article  |   June 2013
Intervention Efficacy and Intensity for Children With Speech Sound Disorder
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melissa M. Allen
    University of Wyoming, Laramie
  • Correspondence to Melissa M. Allen: mallen20@uwyo.edu
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Ann Tyler
    Associate Editor: Ann Tyler×
  • © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   June 2013
Intervention Efficacy and Intensity for Children With Speech Sound Disorder
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2013, Vol. 56, 865-877. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0076)
History: Received March 29, 2011 , Revised September 23, 2011 , Accepted September 28, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2013, Vol. 56, 865-877. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0076)
History: Received March 29, 2011; Revised September 23, 2011; Accepted September 28, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

PurposeClinicians do not have an evidence base they can use to recommend optimum intervention intensity for preschool children who present with speech sound disorder (SSD). This study examined the effect of dose frequency on phonological performance and the efficacy of the multiple oppositions approach.

MethodFifty-four preschool children with SSD were randomly assigned to one of three intervention conditions. Two intervention conditions received the multiple oppositions approach either 3 times per week for 8 weeks (P3) or once weekly for 24 weeks (P1). A control (C) condition received a storybook intervention. Percentage of consonants correct (PCC) was evaluated at 8 weeks and after 24 sessions. PCC gain was examined after a 6-week maintenance period.

ResultsThe P3 condition had a significantly better phonological outcome than the P1 and C conditions at 8 weeks and than the P1 condition after 24 weeks. There were no significant differences between the P1 and C conditions. There was no significant difference between the P1 and P3 conditions in PCC gain during the maintenance period.

ConclusionPreschool children with SSD who received the multiple oppositions approach made significantly greater gains when they were provided with a more intensive dose frequency and when cumulative intervention intensity was held constant.

Acknowledgments
This research project was completed with the support of a research grant awarded by the University of Wyoming Faculty Grant-in-Aid. I would like to thank Teresa Ukrainetz and Sue Torney for comments and suggestions regarding the design and implementation of this project as well as Amber Abel, April Amonson, Anne Marie Austin, Carissa Lee, and Erin McDonald for their research assistance. I would also like to thank the STRIDE Learning Center, its personnel, and the many children and parents associated with the center for their continued research support.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access