Phonetically Trained and Untrained Adults' Transcription of Place of Articulation for Intervocalic Lingual Stops With Intermediate Acoustic Cues PurposeIn this study, the authors aimed to investigate how listener training and the presence of intermediate acoustic cues influence transcription variability for conflicting cue speech stimuli.MethodTwenty listeners with training in transcribing disordered speech, and 26 untrained listeners, were asked to make forced-choice labeling decisions for synthetic vowel–consonant–vowel (VCV) sequences “a ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2013
Phonetically Trained and Untrained Adults' Transcription of Place of Articulation for Intervocalic Lingual Stops With Intermediate Acoustic Cues
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Catherine Mayo
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland
  • Fiona Gibbon
    University College Cork, Ireland
  • Robert A. J. Clark
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland
  • Correspondence to Catherine Mayo: catherin@ling.ed.ac.uk
  • Editor: Robert Schlauch
    Editor: Robert Schlauch×
  • Associate Editor: Benjamin Munson
    Associate Editor: Benjamin Munson×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing
Article   |   June 01, 2013
Phonetically Trained and Untrained Adults' Transcription of Place of Articulation for Intervocalic Lingual Stops With Intermediate Acoustic Cues
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2013, Vol. 56, 779-791. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/10-0280)
History: Received October 6, 2010 , Revised September 2, 2011 , Accepted September 15, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2013, Vol. 56, 779-791. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/10-0280)
History: Received October 6, 2010; Revised September 2, 2011; Accepted September 15, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

PurposeIn this study, the authors aimed to investigate how listener training and the presence of intermediate acoustic cues influence transcription variability for conflicting cue speech stimuli.

MethodTwenty listeners with training in transcribing disordered speech, and 26 untrained listeners, were asked to make forced-choice labeling decisions for synthetic vowel–consonant–vowel (VCV) sequences “a doe” (/ədo/) and “a go” (/əgo/). Both the VC and CV transitions in these stimuli ranged through intermediate positions, from appropriate for /d/ to appropriate for /g/.

ResultsBoth trained and untrained listeners gave more weight to the CV transitions than to the VC transitions. However, listener behavior was not uniform: The results showed a high level of inter- and intratranscriber inconsistency, with untrained listeners showing a nonsignificant tendency to be more influenced than trained listeners by CV transitions.

ConclusionsListeners do not assign consistent categorical labels to the type of intermediate, conflicting transitional cues that were present in the stimuli used in the current study and that are also present in disordered articulations. Although listener inconsistency in assigning labels to intermediate productions is not increased as a result of phonetic training, neither is it reduced by such training.

Acknowledgments
We thank the participants for taking part in the study and Jo Keating and Ben Matthews for their assistance in data collection.
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