Poorer Phonetic Perceivers Show Greater Benefit in Phonetic-Phonological Speech Learning PurposePrevious research has demonstrated that native English speakers can learn lexical tones in word context (pitch-to-word learning), to an extent. However, learning success depends on learners' pre-training sensitivity to pitch patterns. The aim of this study was to determine whether lexical pitch-pattern training given before lexical training could improve learning ... Research Note
Research Note  |   June 01, 2013
Poorer Phonetic Perceivers Show Greater Benefit in Phonetic-Phonological Speech Learning
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Erin M. Ingvalson
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Allison M. Barr
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Patrick C. M. Wong
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Correspondence to Patrick C. M. Wong: p.wong@cuhk.edu.hk
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Marc Joanisse
    Associate Editor: Marc Joanisse×
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language
Research Note   |   June 01, 2013
Poorer Phonetic Perceivers Show Greater Benefit in Phonetic-Phonological Speech Learning
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2013, Vol. 56, 1045-1050. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0024)
History: Received January 17, 2012 , Revised June 7, 2012 , Accepted September 12, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2013, Vol. 56, 1045-1050. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0024)
History: Received January 17, 2012; Revised June 7, 2012; Accepted September 12, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

PurposePrevious research has demonstrated that native English speakers can learn lexical tones in word context (pitch-to-word learning), to an extent. However, learning success depends on learners' pre-training sensitivity to pitch patterns. The aim of this study was to determine whether lexical pitch-pattern training given before lexical training could improve learning and whether or not the extent of improvement depends on pre-training pitch-pattern sensitivity.

MethodLearners with high and low pitch-pattern sensitivity were given training on lexical pitch patterns before lexical training.

ResultsIt was found that such training resulted in better learning than lexical training alone, primarily in learners with low pre-training pitch-pattern sensitivity.

ConclusionThese data support the importance of considering individual aptitudes when developing training and also the notion of phonetic–phonological–lexical continuity in word learning.

Acknowledgment
This research was funded by National Institutes of Health Grants R01DC008333 and K02AG03582 and National Science Foundation Grant BCS-1125144, all of which were awarded to the third author.
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