Consonant Accuracy After Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury: A Prospective Cohort Study Purpose: The authors sought to describe longitudinal changes in Percentage of Consonants Correct—Revised (PCC–R) after severe pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI), to compare the odds of normal-range PCC–R in children injured at older and younger ages, and to correlate predictor variables and PCC–R outcomes.Method: In 56 children injured ... Article
Article  |   June 2013
Consonant Accuracy After Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury: A Prospective Cohort Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas F. Campbell
    Callier Center for Communication Disorders, The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Christine Dollaghan
    Callier Center for Communication Disorders, The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Janine Janosky
    Austen BioInnovation Institute, Akron, OH
  • Heather Leavy Rusiewicz
    Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Steven L. Small
    University of California, Irvine
  • Frederic Dick
    University of London, England
  • Jennell Vick
    Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
  • P. David Adelson
    Barrow Neurological Institute at Phoenix Children's Hospital, AZ
  • Correspondence to Thomas F. Campbell: thomas.f.campbell@utdallas.edu
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Jessica Barlow
    Associate Editor: Jessica Barlow×
  • © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Language
Article   |   June 2013
Consonant Accuracy After Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury: A Prospective Cohort Study
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2013, Vol. 56, 1023-1034. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0077)
History: Received October 14, 2012 , Accepted October 29, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2013, Vol. 56, 1023-1034. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0077)
History: Received October 14, 2012; Accepted October 29, 2012

Purpose: The authors sought to describe longitudinal changes in Percentage of Consonants Correct—Revised (PCC–R) after severe pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI), to compare the odds of normal-range PCC–R in children injured at older and younger ages, and to correlate predictor variables and PCC–R outcomes.

Method: In 56 children injured between age 1 month and 11 years, PCC–R was calculated over 12 monthly sessions beginning when the child produced ≥ 10 words. At each session, the authors compared odds of normal-range PCC–R in children injured at younger (≤ 60 months) and older (> 60 months) ages. Correlations were calculated between final PCC–R and age at injury, injury mechanism, gender, maternal education, residence, treatment, Glasgow Coma Score, and intact brain volume.

Results: PCC–Rs varied within and between children. Odds of normal-range PCC–R were significantly higher for the older than for the younger group at all sessions but the first; odds of normal-range PCC–R were 9 to 33 times higher in the older group in sessions 3 to 12. Age at injury was significantly correlated with final PCC–R.

Conclusion: Over a 12-month period, severe TBI had more adverse effects for children whose ages placed them in the most intensive phase of PCC–R development than for children injured later.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant ROlDC0368 and by Grant MO1RR00084 from the General Clinical Research Center at the Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. We thank Lawrence Shriberg and the staff of the Phonology Project at the University of Wisconsin—Madison for assistance with the speech analyses. We would also like to extend our appreciation to Heidi Feldman for her guidance and consultation throughout this project. We are also indebted to Denise Balason, Jennifer Black, Jill Brady, Stacy Carr, Sharon Gretz, Tammy Nash, Stephanie Nixon, and Dayna Pitcairn for their assistance in completing this study.
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