Article  |   April 2013
Lexical Development in Korean: Vocabulary Size, Lexical Composition, and Late Talking
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Leslie Rescorla
    Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, PA
  • Youn Min Cathy Lee
    Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, PA
  • Kyung Ja Oh
    Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea
  • Young Ah Kim
    Huno Consulting, Seoul, South Korea
  • Correspondence to Leslie Rescorla: lrescorl@brynmawr.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor and Associate Editor: Janna Oetting×
Development / Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Article
Article   |   April 2013
Lexical Development in Korean: Vocabulary Size, Lexical Composition, and Late Talking
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research April 2013, Vol.56, 735-747. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0329)
History: Accepted 28 Aug 2012 , Received 25 Nov 2011 , Revised 14 May 2012
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research April 2013, Vol.56, 735-747. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0329)
History: Accepted 28 Aug 2012 , Received 25 Nov 2011 , Revised 14 May 2012

Purpose: In this study, the authors aimed to compare vocabulary size, lexical composition, and late talking in large samples of Korean and U.S. children ages 18–35 months.

Method: Data for 2,191 Korean children (211 children recruited “offline” through preschools, and 1,980 recruited “online” via the Internet) and 274 U.S. children were obtained using the Language Development Survey (LDS).

Results: Mean vocabulary size was slightly larger in the offline than the online group, but the groups were acquiring almost identical words. Mean vocabulary size did not differ by country; girls and older children had larger vocabularies in both countries. The Korean–U.S. Q correlations for percentage use of LDS words (.53 and .56) indicated considerable concordance across countries in lexical composition. Noun dominance was as large in Korean lexicons as in U.S. lexicons. About half of the most commonly reported words for the Korean and U.S. children were identical. Lexicons of late talkers resembled those of typically developing younger children in the same sample.

Conclusions: Despite linguistic and discourse differences between Korean and English, LDS findings indicated considerable cross-linguistic similarity with respect to vocabulary size, lexical composition, and late talking.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access

Related Articles

Erratum
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research August 2013, Vol.56, 1346. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2013/er-0731)
Cross-Linguistic and Cross-Cultural Effects on Verbal Working Memory and Vocabulary: Testing Language-Minority Children With an Immigrant Background
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research April 2013, Vol.56, 630-642. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0079)
Age 17 Language and Reading Outcomes in Late-Talking Toddlers: Support for a Dimensional Perspective on Language Delay
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research February 2009, Vol.52, 16-30. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0171)
Lexical and Grammatical Associations in Sequential Bilingual Preschoolers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research June 2010, Vol.53, 684-698. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0126)
Statistical Learning in Emerging Lexicons: The Case of Danish
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research October 2012, Vol.55, 1265-1273. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/10-0291)