Is More Better? Milieu Communication Teaching in Toddlers With Intellectual Disabilities Purpose The authors sought to determine whether a program of 5 weekly doses of milieu communication teaching (MCT) would yield improvements in children's communication and word use compared with a once-weekly delivery of the same treatment. Method Sixty-four children with intellectual and communication delay were randomly assigned to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 2013
Is More Better? Milieu Communication Teaching in Toddlers With Intellectual Disabilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marc E. Fey
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Paul J. Yoder
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Steven F. Warren
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Shelley L. Bredin-Oja
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Correspondence to Marc E. Fey: mfey@kumc.edu
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Elizabeth Crais
    Associate Editor: Elizabeth Crais×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 2013
Is More Better? Milieu Communication Teaching in Toddlers With Intellectual Disabilities
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2013, Vol. 56, 679-693. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0061)
History: Received February 20, 2012 , Revised August 15, 2012 , Accepted August 27, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2013, Vol. 56, 679-693. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0061)
History: Received February 20, 2012; Revised August 15, 2012; Accepted August 27, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 21

Purpose The authors sought to determine whether a program of 5 weekly doses of milieu communication teaching (MCT) would yield improvements in children's communication and word use compared with a once-weekly delivery of the same treatment.

Method Sixty-four children with intellectual and communication delay were randomly assigned to receive 60-min sessions of MCT either 1 time or 5 times per week over a 9-month treatment. Growth curves were fit to data collected at 5 points before, during, and after the MCT was delivered.

Results With groups collapsed, significant growth across the experimental period was observed on all measures, but this was not associated unconditionally with treatment intensity. Children who played with 9 or more objects during a standard play assessment, an empirically identified cut-point, benefited more from the high- than from the low-intensity treatment on lexical measures (Hedges's g range = .49 to .65).

Conclusions More MCT is not always better for all children. Clinicians can expect that increasing the frequency of MCT sessions will yield moderate enhancement of outcomes if the child has high interest in objects.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01DC007660 and National Institute on Child Health and Human Development Center Grant P30 NICHD HD 002528. We acknowledge the significant contributions of Jayne Brandel, Catherine Bush, Debby Daniels, Elizabeth Gardner, Nicole Thompson, and Peggy Waggoner.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access