Reading Vocabulary in Children With and Without Hearing Loss: The Roles of Task and Word Type Purpose To address the problem of low reading comprehension scores among children with hearing impairment, it is necessary to have a better understanding of their reading vocabulary. In this study, the authors investigated whether task and word type differentiate the reading vocabulary knowledge of children with and without severe hearing ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2013
Reading Vocabulary in Children With and Without Hearing Loss: The Roles of Task and Word Type
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karien M. Coppens
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands
  • Agnes Tellings
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands
  • Ludo Verhoeven
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands
  • Robert Schreuder
    Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Centre for Cognition, Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands
  • Correspondence to Karien M. Coppens: karien.coppens@gmail.com
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor and Associate Editor: Janna Oetting×
Article Information
Development / Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Normal Language Processing / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2013
Reading Vocabulary in Children With and Without Hearing Loss: The Roles of Task and Word Type
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2013, Vol. 56, 654-666. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0138)
History: Received June 1, 2011 , Revised October 10, 2011 , Accepted August 8, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2013, Vol. 56, 654-666. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0138)
History: Received June 1, 2011; Revised October 10, 2011; Accepted August 8, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

Purpose To address the problem of low reading comprehension scores among children with hearing impairment, it is necessary to have a better understanding of their reading vocabulary. In this study, the authors investigated whether task and word type differentiate the reading vocabulary knowledge of children with and without severe hearing loss.

Method Seventy-two children with hearing loss and 72 children with normal hearing performed a lexical and a use decision task. Both tasks contained the same 180 words divided over 7 clusters, each cluster containing words with a similar pattern of scores on 8 word properties (word class, frequency, morphological family size, length, age of acquisition, mode of acquisition, imageability, and familiarity).

Results Whereas the children with normal hearing scored better on the 2 tasks than the children with hearing loss, the size of the difference varied depending on the type of task and word.

Conclusions Performance differences between the 2 groups increased as words and tasks became more complex. Despite delays, children with hearing loss showed a similar pattern of vocabulary acquisition as their peers with normal hearing. For the most precise assessment of reading vocabulary possible, a range of tasks and word types should be used.

Acknowledgment
This study was funded by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research Grant 400-05-119.
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