Rapid Naming by Children With and Without Specific Language Impairment Purpose Previous studies have reported that children with specific language impairment (SLI) name pictures more slowly than do chronological age–matched (CAM) peers. Rapid naming depends on 2 factors known to be problematic for children with SLI—lexical retrieval and nonlinguistic speed of processing. Although all studies implicate a speed-of-processing deficit as ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2013
Rapid Naming by Children With and Without Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeffry A. Coady
    University of Colorado, Boulder
  • Correspondence to Jeffry A. Coady: jeff.coady@colorado.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor and Associate Editor: Janna Oetting×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2013
Rapid Naming by Children With and Without Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2013, Vol. 56, 604-617. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/10-0144)
History: Received May 28, 2010 , Revised February 23, 2011 , Accepted July 21, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2013, Vol. 56, 604-617. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/10-0144)
History: Received May 28, 2010; Revised February 23, 2011; Accepted July 21, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 13

Purpose Previous studies have reported that children with specific language impairment (SLI) name pictures more slowly than do chronological age–matched (CAM) peers. Rapid naming depends on 2 factors known to be problematic for children with SLI—lexical retrieval and nonlinguistic speed of processing. Although all studies implicate a speed-of-processing deficit as a contributing factor, researchers do not agree on the influence of language factors. The purpose of the current study was to explore word frequency (WF) and phonotactic pattern frequency (PPF) as potential lexical factors contributing to the naming deficits experienced by children with SLI.

Method Three groups of children—20 children with SLI (Mage = 9;8 [years;months]), 20 younger vocabulary-matched (VM) controls, and 20 CAM controls—named pictures whose labels varied by WF and PPF.

Results Reaction time results revealed significant main effects of group (CAM < SLI = VM) and WF (high WF < low WF). Effects due to WF were comparable for all groups, but a significant Group × PPF interaction revealed that PPF effects were greater for children with SLI than for VM or CAM children.

Conclusion Results replicate previous findings of a naming deficit in children with SLI. Furthermore, results suggest that children with SLI are more vulnerable to increased competition from words with frequent phonotactic patterns, which also come from dense phonological neighborhoods.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant DC 5650 (Julia L. Evans, P.I.). Many thanks to the children and their families for participating. Thanks to Julia Evans for providing support for all phases of this project and to Kerry Howland and Kristine Strand for helpful discussions during the preparation of this article. A preliminary version of this work was presented at the 30th Annual Symposium on Research in Child Language Disorders, Madison, WI (June 2009).
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access