Early Vocabulary Delay and Behavioral/Emotional Problems in Early Childhood: The Generation R Study Purpose The authors tested associations between (a) parent-reported temporary vs. persistent vocabulary delay and (b) parent-reported behavioral/emotional problems in a sample of 5,497 young Dutch children participating in a prospective population-based study. Method Mothers completed the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory—Netherlands (Zink & Lejaegere, 2003) at age 18 months ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2013
Early Vocabulary Delay and Behavioral/Emotional Problems in Early Childhood: The Generation R Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jens Henrichs
    Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands
  • Leslie Rescorla
    Bryn Mawr College, PA
  • Cootje Donkersloot
    Erasmus University, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
  • Jacqueline J. Schenk
    Erasmus University, Rotterdam, the Netherlands
  • Hein Raat
    Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands
  • Vincent W. V. Jaddoe
    Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands
  • Albert Hofman
    Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands
  • Frank C. Verhulst
    Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands
  • Henning Tiemeier
    Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands
  • Correspondence to Henning Tiemeier: h.tiemeier@erasmusmc.nl
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Elizabeth Crais
    Associate Editor: Elizabeth Crais×
Article Information
Development / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2013
Early Vocabulary Delay and Behavioral/Emotional Problems in Early Childhood: The Generation R Study
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2013, Vol. 56, 553-566. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0169)
History: Received July 4, 2011 , Revised January 9, 2012 , Accepted July 10, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2013, Vol. 56, 553-566. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0169)
History: Received July 4, 2011; Revised January 9, 2012; Accepted July 10, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

Purpose The authors tested associations between (a) parent-reported temporary vs. persistent vocabulary delay and (b) parent-reported behavioral/emotional problems in a sample of 5,497 young Dutch children participating in a prospective population-based study.

Method Mothers completed the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory—Netherlands (Zink & Lejaegere, 2003) at age 18 months and the Language Development Survey (Rescorla, 1989) at age 30 months, with expressive vocabulary delay defined as scores in the lowest 15th age- and gender-specific percentiles. The Child Behavior Checklist (Achenbach & Rescorla, 2000) was completed by mothers when their children were age 18 months and by both parents when their children were age 36 months, from which Internalizing Problems and Externalizing Problems scores were analyzed.

Results All analyses were adjusted for covariates. Expressive vocabulary delay at age 18 months was weakly related to Internalizing Problems scores at age 18 months as well as mother-reported Externalizing and Internalizing Problems scores at age 36 months (the latter for boys only). Expressive vocabulary delay at age 30 months was weakly associated with mother-reported Externalizing and Internalizing Problems scores (the latter for boys only) and father-reported Internalizing Problems scores. Persistent expressive vocabulary delay predicted the highest risk of mother-reported internalizing and externalizing problems at age 36 months.

Conclusion This population-based study showed modest associations between vocabulary delay and behavioral/emotional problems detectable from 18 months onward.

Acknowledgments
The Generation R Study is conducted by the Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands, in close collaboration with the School of Law and Faculty of Social Sciences of the Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Municipal Health Service Rotterdam area, the Rotterdam Homecare Foundation, and the Stichting Trombosedienst & Artsenlaboratorium Rijnmond (STAR), Rotterdam. We gratefully acknowledge the contribution of participating families, general practitioners, hospitals, midwives, and pharmacies in Rotterdam. The first phase of the Generation R Study is made possible by financial support from the Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, the Erasmus University Rotterdam, and the Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development (Grant 10.000.1003).
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