Visually and Auditorily Paced Keytapping Performance During Synchronous, Decreased, and Delayed Auditory and Visual Feedback Twenty female subjects tapped on a tapping key to programmed visual pacing stimuli under synchronous auditory feedback, delayed auditory feedback, and decreased sensory feedback conditions and also to programmed auditory pacing stimuli under synchronous visual feedback, delayed visual feedback, and decreased sensory feedback conditions. Cross-modality matching procedures were employed to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1967
Visually and Auditorily Paced Keytapping Performance During Synchronous, Decreased, and Delayed Auditory and Visual Feedback
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Raymond S. Karlovich
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
  • James T. Graham
    Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1967
Visually and Auditorily Paced Keytapping Performance During Synchronous, Decreased, and Delayed Auditory and Visual Feedback
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1967, Vol. 10, 865-875. doi:10.1044/jshr.1004.865
History: Received May 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1967, Vol. 10, 865-875. doi:10.1044/jshr.1004.865
History: Received May 1, 1967

Twenty female subjects tapped on a tapping key to programmed visual pacing stimuli under synchronous auditory feedback, delayed auditory feedback, and decreased sensory feedback conditions and also to programmed auditory pacing stimuli under synchronous visual feedback, delayed visual feedback, and decreased sensory feedback conditions. Cross-modality matching procedures were employed to equate the perceptual magnitudes of the auditory and visual stimuli. Pattern duration and tapping key displacement variables were evaluated and it was noted that the relative perceptual magnitudes between pacing and feedback stimuli are important aspects determining the degree of alteration in keytapping motor performance under delayed sensory feedback. The data also indicated that increases in the intensity of tapping observed under delayed sensory feedback conditions were not due to the temporal distortion of the feedback but possibly to an absence of feedback at the moment of tapping.

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