Effects of Alterations of Prosodic Features on the Sequencing Performance of Aphasic Children Eight aphasic and eight normal children were studied to determine whether alterations in prosodic features of auditory stimuli would enhance their sequencing ability. Five of the aphasic children had difficulty with sequences of three. The results indicated that their sequencing difficulty is largely due to forgetting the first item in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1967
Effects of Alterations of Prosodic Features on the Sequencing Performance of Aphasic Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joel Stark
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California
  • Roger Poppen
    Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California
  • Michael Z. May
    University of Hawaii School of Medicine, Honolulu, Hawaii
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1967
Effects of Alterations of Prosodic Features on the Sequencing Performance of Aphasic Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1967, Vol. 10, 849-855. doi:10.1044/jshr.1004.849
History: Received June 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1967, Vol. 10, 849-855. doi:10.1044/jshr.1004.849
History: Received June 1, 1967

Eight aphasic and eight normal children were studied to determine whether alterations in prosodic features of auditory stimuli would enhance their sequencing ability.

Five of the aphasic children had difficulty with sequences of three. The results indicated that their sequencing difficulty is largely due to forgetting the first item in the sequence. When the initial item was stressed, recall of the entire sequence was enhanced. When other features of the sequence were altered, recall was disrupted. These effects were not observed in the normal group.

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