Some “Cloze” Technique Studies of Language Capability in the Deaf The performances of 40 deaf adolescents (18 year olds) and 40 sixth-grade hearing students were compared on a multiple-choice sentence completion test. The deaf subjects' scores were significantly lower than the hearing subjects' scores, particularly for adjectives, prepositions, and conjunctions. A variation of the “cloze” procedure was administered to 63 ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1967
Some “Cloze” Technique Studies of Language Capability in the Deaf
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Penelope B. Odom
    Vanderhilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
  • Richard L. Blanton
    Vanderhilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
  • Jum C. Nunnally
    Vanderhilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1967
Some “Cloze” Technique Studies of Language Capability in the Deaf
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1967, Vol. 10, 816-827. doi:10.1044/jshr.1004.816
History: Received May 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1967, Vol. 10, 816-827. doi:10.1044/jshr.1004.816
History: Received May 1, 1967

The performances of 40 deaf adolescents (18 year olds) and 40 sixth-grade hearing students were compared on a multiple-choice sentence completion test. The deaf subjects' scores were significantly lower than the hearing subjects' scores, particularly for adjectives, prepositions, and conjunctions.

A variation of the “cloze” procedure was administered to 63 deaf subjects from the Pennsylvania School for the Deaf, 93 deaf subjects from the Tennessee School for the Deaf, 95 fifth-grade hearing subjects, and 76 twelfth-grade hearing subjects. Three conditions were used: a printed story with either every third word, every fourth word, or every fifth word deleted. The results indicated that the two deaf groups performed similarly but much lower than either of the hearing groups. There was no general effect of span between deleted words; only the deaf increased in ability to predict the correct form class of function words with increasing span between deleted words. It was suggested that the deaf use quite different types of rules in constructing a sentence than hearing subjects, particularly with regard to function words.

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