Linguistic Factors in Stuttering Ten stutterers recorded a 141 word passage in the presence of a single listener. The words in the passage were classified as lexical or function words and pronouns, and high information or low information words. In addition, unitary stutterings were classified as either prolongations or repetitions. The linguistic factors, stutterings, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1967
Linguistic Factors in Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • George A. Soderberg
    Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1967
Linguistic Factors in Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1967, Vol. 10, 801-810. doi:10.1044/jshr.1004.801
History: Received May 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1967, Vol. 10, 801-810. doi:10.1044/jshr.1004.801
History: Received May 1, 1967

Ten stutterers recorded a 141 word passage in the presence of a single listener. The words in the passage were classified as lexical or function words and pronouns, and high information or low information words. In addition, unitary stutterings were classified as either prolongations or repetitions. The linguistic factors, stutterings, and stuttering types were analyzed with respect to initial, medial, and final positions of words in phonemic clauses and total words in the clauses.

The findings of this study support the contention that stuttering is related to the encoding processes of speaking. It was hypothesized that the phonemic clause operates as an encoding unit in speaking and both grammatical and lexical uncertainty play roles in eliciting the instance of stuttering and type of stuttering instance.

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