Loci of Disfluencies in the Speech of Nonstutterers During Oral Reading The purpose of the present study was to determine whether “disfluencies” in the speech of nonstutterers occur most frequently on words possessing the four linguistic attributes which Brown (1945) reported were related to the occurrence of “stutterings” in the speech of his stutterers. A group of 24 male nonstutterers, ranging ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1967
Loci of Disfluencies in the Speech of Nonstutterers During Oral Reading
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Franklin H. Silverman
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
  • Dean E. Williams
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1967
Loci of Disfluencies in the Speech of Nonstutterers During Oral Reading
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1967, Vol. 10, 790-794. doi:10.1044/jshr.1004.790
History: Received April 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1967, Vol. 10, 790-794. doi:10.1044/jshr.1004.790
History: Received April 1, 1967

The purpose of the present study was to determine whether “disfluencies” in the speech of nonstutterers occur most frequently on words possessing the four linguistic attributes which Brown (1945) reported were related to the occurrence of “stutterings” in the speech of his stutterers. A group of 24 male nonstutterers, ranging in age from 18 to 34 years, read the same 1000-word passage used by Brown. All words judged to have been spoken disfluently, a total of 226, were analyzed for the presence of Brown’s four word characteristics, i.e., initial phoneme, grammatical function, sentence position, and word length.

Disfluencies were not randomly distributed in the speech of these nonstutterers. Disfluencies occurred most frequently on words possessing the same attributes (except sentence position) as the words on which Brown reported his stutterers stuttered. The findings of this study demonstrate the essential similarity of the loci of the normal speaker’s disfluencies and the stutterer’s “stutterings.”

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