Grammatical Function in Relation to Stuttering in Young Children Samples of the speech of 13 stutterers from two to six years of age were studied to determine to what extent the distribution of stutterings was related to the grammatical functions of words. The findings were markedly different from those reported on older stutterers. For the most part the stutterings ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1967
Grammatical Function in Relation to Stuttering in Young Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Oliver Bloodstein
    Brooklyn College, Brooklyn, New York
  • Barbara F. Gantwerk
    Ramat Hasharon, Israel
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1967
Grammatical Function in Relation to Stuttering in Young Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1967, Vol. 10, 786-789. doi:10.1044/jshr.1004.786
History: Received June 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1967, Vol. 10, 786-789. doi:10.1044/jshr.1004.786
History: Received June 1, 1967

Samples of the speech of 13 stutterers from two to six years of age were studied to determine to what extent the distribution of stutterings was related to the grammatical functions of words. The findings were markedly different from those reported on older stutterers. For the most part the stutterings were randomly distributed with respect to the grammatical factor, but there was a tendency for stuttering to occur unusually often on pronouns and conjunctions and less often, in relation to chance expectation, on nouns and interjections. The excessive stuttering on pronouns and conjunctions appeared to be largely the effect of the high frequency of stuttering on the first word of the sentence. It was concluded that a true grammatical factor does not exist in the initial phase of stuttering, and probably emerges only with the emergence of difficult words.

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