Familiarity and Intelligibility of Monosyllabic Word Lists Intelligibility functions of word lists and a sample of continuous discourse distorted by several levels of low-pass filtering demonstrate the effect of word familiarity when normal-hearing subjects are listening to distorted speech. Lists of varying degrees of familiarity compiled by Owens (1961), PB-50 lists 6 and 9, W-22 list 1-A, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1968
Familiarity and Intelligibility of Monosyllabic Word Lists
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Aubrey Epstein
    Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana
  • Thomas G. Giolas
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas
  • Elmer Owens
    University of California Medical Center, San Francisco, California
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1968
Familiarity and Intelligibility of Monosyllabic Word Lists
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1968, Vol. 11, 435-438. doi:10.1044/jshr.1102.435
History: Received September 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1968, Vol. 11, 435-438. doi:10.1044/jshr.1102.435
History: Received September 1, 1967

Intelligibility functions of word lists and a sample of continuous discourse distorted by several levels of low-pass filtering demonstrate the effect of word familiarity when normal-hearing subjects are listening to distorted speech. Lists of varying degrees of familiarity compiled by Owens (1961), PB-50 lists 6 and 9, W-22 list 1-A, and a sample of continuous discourse are compared. Errors increased as distortion increased for the lists falling in the “unfamiliar” category, while intelligibility remained undisturbed in the continuous discourse and in the “familiar” lists as long as frequencies below 1560 Hz were left intact.

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