Discriminative Learning in Children’s Acquisition of Phonology The theories of acquired equivalence and acquired distinctiveness of cues are presented as particularly effectual models in terms of their capacity to explain certain normal and deviant articulation learning. Articulation therapy is discussed as an application of the acquired distinctiveness model. Both theories generate basic, clinically pertinent, testable questions. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1968
Discriminative Learning in Children’s Acquisition of Phonology
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John L. Locke
    Veterans Administration Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1968
Discriminative Learning in Children’s Acquisition of Phonology
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1968, Vol. 11, 428-434. doi:10.1044/jshr.1102.428
History: Received October 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1968, Vol. 11, 428-434. doi:10.1044/jshr.1102.428
History: Received October 1, 1967

The theories of acquired equivalence and acquired distinctiveness of cues are presented as particularly effectual models in terms of their capacity to explain certain normal and deviant articulation learning. Articulation therapy is discussed as an application of the acquired distinctiveness model. Both theories generate basic, clinically pertinent, testable questions.

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