Echolalia, IQ, and the Developmental Dichotomy of Speech and Language Systems Language and speech performances of 22 echolalic three-year-olds were compared with a nonechoic group of the same age who were individually matched for four-year IQ as well as for race and sex. Results revealed poorer performances by echolalic subjects on all language measures, but no differences in articulation. The mitigated ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1968
Echolalia, IQ, and the Developmental Dichotomy of Speech and Language Systems
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Warren H. Fay
    University of Oregon Medical School, Portland, Oregon
  • Bruce V. Butler
    University of Oregon Medical School, Portland, Oregon
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1968
Echolalia, IQ, and the Developmental Dichotomy of Speech and Language Systems
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1968, Vol. 11, 365-371. doi:10.1044/jshr.1102.365
History: Received October 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1968, Vol. 11, 365-371. doi:10.1044/jshr.1102.365
History: Received October 1, 1967

Language and speech performances of 22 echolalic three-year-olds were compared with a nonechoic group of the same age who were individually matched for four-year IQ as well as for race and sex. Results revealed poorer performances by echolalic subjects on all language measures, but no differences in articulation. The mitigated echoers had higher verbal performances than the pure echoers and a significantly higher mean IQ. The results are discussed in terms of the relative independence of the audio-motor system from the syntactic-semantic system.

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