Judge Reliability in Infant Testing Three groups of judges, pediatric audiologists, audiologists, and laymen viewed 96 videotape sequences (test-retest) of eight-month old babies exposed to auditory stimuli. Two levels of intensity and three types of stimuli were used. Control pictures using no stimulus were included in the series. All judges reversed themselves (“yes” to “no”, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1968
Judge Reliability in Infant Testing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John P. Moncur
    Callier Hearing and Speech Center, Dallas, Texas
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1968
Judge Reliability in Infant Testing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1968, Vol. 11, 348-357. doi:10.1044/jshr.1102.348
History: Received September 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1968, Vol. 11, 348-357. doi:10.1044/jshr.1102.348
History: Received September 1, 1967

Three groups of judges, pediatric audiologists, audiologists, and laymen viewed 96 videotape sequences (test-retest) of eight-month old babies exposed to auditory stimuli. Two levels of intensity and three types of stimuli were used. Control pictures using no stimulus were included in the series. All judges reversed themselves (“yes” to “no”, “no” to “yes”) on approximately 18% of the items. One-half of the reversals occurred on no-stimulus pictures. The results of all audiologists are slightly more consistent than that of laymen. Of concern was the number of “yes” responses by all judges on the no-stimulus pictures—39%. Unwanted random movements often intrude in the testing of babies and serve as contaminants of the judging process.

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