The Effects of High Gain Amplification on Children in a Residential School for the Deaf The audiometric records of 58 children covering an eight- to ten-year span were statistically analyzed to determine if hearing-aid amplification had a deleterious effect on the residual hearing. In 25 cases, the unaided ear served as a control for the aided ear. In the remaining 33 cases, the objective was ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1968
The Effects of High Gain Amplification on Children in a Residential School for the Deaf
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Philip A. Bellefleur
    Clarke School for the Deaf, Northhampton, Massachusetts
  • Robert C. Van Dyke
    Clarke School for the Deaf, Northhampton, Massachusetts
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1968
The Effects of High Gain Amplification on Children in a Residential School for the Deaf
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1968, Vol. 11, 343-347. doi:10.1044/jshr.1102.343
History: Received September 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1968, Vol. 11, 343-347. doi:10.1044/jshr.1102.343
History: Received September 1, 1967

The audiometric records of 58 children covering an eight- to ten-year span were statistically analyzed to determine if hearing-aid amplification had a deleterious effect on the residual hearing. In 25 cases, the unaided ear served as a control for the aided ear. In the remaining 33 cases, the objective was to statistically select the aided ear. Subjects were also subdivided into those with extrinsic and intrinsic deafness. It was hypothesized that if amplification had an effect on hearing loss over a period of time, it would be apparent through comparison of the aided and unaided ears. The results indicate no differences between ears for subjects during the years of this study.

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