The Development of Auditory Feedback Monitoring: II. Delayed Auditory Feedback Studies on the Speech of Children Between Two and Three Years of Age Two experiments were conducted to determine whether the auditory feedback monitoring system for speech is operative in children between two and three years of age. The procedure involved a 200 msec delay in the auditory feedback of the subject’s speech. Bilateral signal presentation was used for the synchronous (SAF) and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1968
The Development of Auditory Feedback Monitoring: II. Delayed Auditory Feedback Studies on the Speech of Children Between Two and Three Years of Age
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Grace Yeni-Komshian
    The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Richard Allen Chase
    The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Richard L. Mobley
    The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1968
The Development of Auditory Feedback Monitoring: II. Delayed Auditory Feedback Studies on the Speech of Children Between Two and Three Years of Age
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1968, Vol. 11, 307-315. doi:10.1044/jshr.1102.307
History: Received October 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1968, Vol. 11, 307-315. doi:10.1044/jshr.1102.307
History: Received October 1, 1967

Two experiments were conducted to determine whether the auditory feedback monitoring system for speech is operative in children between two and three years of age. The procedure involved a 200 msec delay in the auditory feedback of the subject’s speech. Bilateral signal presentation was used for the synchronous (SAF) and delay (DAF) conditions. Phonation time scores under DAF and SAF conditions were compared. In Experiment I, 10 subjects, ages 2 years, 4 months to 2 years, 11 months, followed a standard object naming task. Speech samples obtained from a younger group of 5 subjects in Experiment II, ages 1 year, 9 months to 2 years, 2 months, consisted of all verbal responses which occurred under both DAF and SAF conditions. The results of Experiment I provide evidence that the auditory feedback monitoring system for speech is operative in this age group. The speech of the younger subjects in Experiment II was not strongly affected by the time delay in auditory feedback. The results of the present experiments, together with findings obtained in an earlier study with four- to nine-year-old subjects, suggest that older children show greater DAF effects than younger children.

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