Effects of Signal Duration and Rise Time on the Auditory Evoked Potential Summing computer technique was used to study the effects of signal duration and rise time on evoked auditory responses of 40 adult subjects. An additional objective was to determine whether signal duration for short signals up to 150 msec would reflect temporal summation through amplitude and latency changes in the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1968
Effects of Signal Duration and Rise Time on the Auditory Evoked Potential
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul H. Skinner
    University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
  • Howard C. Jones
    University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1968
Effects of Signal Duration and Rise Time on the Auditory Evoked Potential
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1968, Vol. 11, 301-306. doi:10.1044/jshr.1102.301
History: Received September 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1968, Vol. 11, 301-306. doi:10.1044/jshr.1102.301
History: Received September 1, 1967

Summing computer technique was used to study the effects of signal duration and rise time on evoked auditory responses of 40 adult subjects. An additional objective was to determine whether signal duration for short signals up to 150 msec would reflect temporal summation through amplitude and latency changes in the wave form of evoked potentials. In the experiment on signal-duration, 1000 Hz tones were presented at near threshold levels (10 or 15 dB SL) to maximize the probability of observing the possible effects of temporal summation. In the second experiment different rise times with 1000 Hz stimuli were presented at four sensation levels: 30, 50, 70, and 90 dB. No consistent trend was observed in the evoked responses with increments in signal duration. Conversely, a very clear trend of increased peak amplitude in the potentials occurred as signal rise-time was decreased.

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