Parameters of Voice Production: I Some Mechanisms for the Regulation of Pitch Measurements of fundamental frequency, SPL, electrical activity of the cricothyroid muscle, mean subglottic pressure, mean airflow rate, acoustic power, glottal resistance, glottal efficiency, and subglottic power were made with voice pitch manipulated systematically under three conditions. Subjects were two semitrained adult males. Fundamental frequency typically varied directly with subglottic pressure, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1968
Parameters of Voice Production: I Some Mechanisms for the Regulation of Pitch
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • William H. Perkins
    University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
  • Naoaki Yanagihara
    Institute of Laryngology and Voice Disorders, Los Angeles, California
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1968
Parameters of Voice Production: I Some Mechanisms for the Regulation of Pitch
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1968, Vol. 11, 246-267. doi:10.1044/jshr.1102.246
History: Received November 1, 1967
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1968, Vol. 11, 246-267. doi:10.1044/jshr.1102.246
History: Received November 1, 1967

Measurements of fundamental frequency, SPL, electrical activity of the cricothyroid muscle, mean subglottic pressure, mean airflow rate, acoustic power, glottal resistance, glottal efficiency, and subglottic power were made with voice pitch manipulated systematically under three conditions. Subjects were two semitrained adult males. Fundamental frequency typically varied directly with subglottic pressure, glottal resistance, and electrical activity of the cricothyroid muscle, and inversely with mean flow rate at middle and upper pitches. Over a lower range of pitch mean subglottic pressure was constant, mean flow rate varied directly with the fundamental but glottal resistance varied inversely. Electrical activity and glottal resistance were positively correlated at middle and upper pitches. Peaks of glottal efficiency occurred over a range of frequencies that could be considered as an optimum pitch range.

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