The Role of Pragmatic Language Use in Mediating the Relation Between Hyperactivity and Inattention and Social Skills Problems PurposeIn the present study, the authors explored whether pragmatic language use was associated with, and perhaps accounted for, the social skills problems that children with varying levels of hyperactivity and inattention experience.MethodA community sample of 54 children aged 9–11 years participated. Pragmatic language use, hyperactivity and inattention, and social skills ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2011
The Role of Pragmatic Language Use in Mediating the Relation Between Hyperactivity and Inattention and Social Skills Problems
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melinda A. Leonard
    University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
    University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
  • Richard Milich
    University of Kentucky, Louisville, KY
    University of Kentucky, Louisville, KY
  • Elizabeth P. Lorch
    University of Kentucky, Louisville, KY
    University of Kentucky, Louisville, KY
  • Correspondence to Melinda A. Leonard: melinda.leonard@louisville.edu
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Sean Redmond
    Associate Editor: Sean Redmond×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language
Article   |   April 01, 2011
The Role of Pragmatic Language Use in Mediating the Relation Between Hyperactivity and Inattention and Social Skills Problems
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2011, Vol. 54, 567-579. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0058)
History: Received February 26, 2010 , Revised June 24, 2010 , Accepted July 30, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2011, Vol. 54, 567-579. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0058)
History: Received February 26, 2010; Revised June 24, 2010; Accepted July 30, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 20

PurposeIn the present study, the authors explored whether pragmatic language use was associated with, and perhaps accounted for, the social skills problems that children with varying levels of hyperactivity and inattention experience.

MethodA community sample of 54 children aged 9–11 years participated. Pragmatic language use, hyperactivity and inattention, and social skills were examined utilizing data collected from standardized parent-report rating scales.

ResultsPragmatic language use fully mediated the relation between hyperactivity and social skills problems and partially mediated the relation between inattention and social skills problems. Further, pragmatic language use provided a unique contribution in the estimate of children’s social skills of 21.6% above and beyond the contribution of hyperactivity and 17.2% above and beyond the contribution of inattention.

ConclusionsPossible explanations for these mediation results are discussed in terms of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and the problems that they experience with social relations.

Acknowledgments
Funding for this research was provided, in part, by the University of Kentucky Women’s Club 2008 Endowed Fellowship, awarded to the first author for dissertation completion. We would like to thank Darrell Leonard and Jesse Yule for their assistance in collecting, transcribing, and coding videos and transcripts. We would also like to thank the parents and children who participated in this study. Without their willingness to take part in cognitive developmental research, this project would not have been possible.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access