Article  |   April 2011
Feasibility, Efficacy, and Social Validity of Home-Based Storybook Reading Intervention for Children With Language Impairment
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laura M. Justice
    The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Lori E. Skibbe
    Michigan State University, East Lansing
  • Anita S. McGinty
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville
  • Shayne B. Piasta
    The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Stephen Petrill
    The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Associate Editor: Carol Miller
    Associate Editor: Carol Miller×
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Correspondence to Laura M. Justice: justice.57@osu.edu
Development / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Language
Article   |   April 2011
Feasibility, Efficacy, and Social Validity of Home-Based Storybook Reading Intervention for Children With Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research April 2011, Vol.54, 523-538. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0151)
History: Accepted 03 Jul 2010 , Received 27 Jul 2009 , Revised 04 Jan 2010
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research April 2011, Vol.54, 523-538. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0151)
History: Accepted 03 Jul 2010 , Received 27 Jul 2009 , Revised 04 Jan 2010

Purpose: This study evaluated the feasibility, efficacy, and social validity of a parent-implemented intervention for promoting print knowledge in preschoolers with language impairment.

Method: This trial involved 62 children and their parents. Each dyad completed a 12-week intervention program. Parents in the treatment group implemented print-focused reading sessions; parents in two comparison groups implemented sessions focused on either storybook pictures (picture-focused condition) or phonological concepts (sound-focused condition).

Results: Many parents completed the program successfully, but attrition was high; 23% of families dropped out of the program. Children who remained in the treatment group demonstrated significantly greater gains on 1 of 2 measures of print knowledge compared with those in the picture-focused condition but not the sound-focused condition. Parents generally reported favorable impressions of the program, although several aspects of the program received higher ratings from parents in the print-focused group.

Conclusion: Study results raise questions about the feasibility of home-based intervention for some families; future research that examines the characteristics of families that may affect completion are needed. The causal effects of print-focused reading sessions are promising for addressing children’s print-concept knowledge but not alphabet knowledge. Home-based reading intervention has considerable social validity as a therapeutic approach.

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