Article  |   April 2011
Feasibility, Efficacy, and Social Validity of Home-Based Storybook Reading Intervention for Children With Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laura M. Justice
    The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Lori E. Skibbe
    Michigan State University, East Lansing
  • Anita S. McGinty
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville
  • Shayne B. Piasta
    The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Stephen Petrill
    The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Correspondence to Laura M. Justice: justice.57@osu.edu
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Carol Miller
    Associate Editor: Carol Miller×
Article Information
Development / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Language
Article   |   April 2011
Feasibility, Efficacy, and Social Validity of Home-Based Storybook Reading Intervention for Children With Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2011, Vol. 54, 523-538. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0151)
History: Received July 27, 2009 , Revised January 4, 2010 , Accepted July 3, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2011, Vol. 54, 523-538. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0151)
History: Received July 27, 2009; Revised January 4, 2010; Accepted July 3, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

Purpose: This study evaluated the feasibility, efficacy, and social validity of a parent-implemented intervention for promoting print knowledge in preschoolers with language impairment.

Method: This trial involved 62 children and their parents. Each dyad completed a 12-week intervention program. Parents in the treatment group implemented print-focused reading sessions; parents in two comparison groups implemented sessions focused on either storybook pictures (picture-focused condition) or phonological concepts (sound-focused condition).

Results: Many parents completed the program successfully, but attrition was high; 23% of families dropped out of the program. Children who remained in the treatment group demonstrated significantly greater gains on 1 of 2 measures of print knowledge compared with those in the picture-focused condition but not the sound-focused condition. Parents generally reported favorable impressions of the program, although several aspects of the program received higher ratings from parents in the print-focused group.

Conclusion: Study results raise questions about the feasibility of home-based intervention for some families; future research that examines the characteristics of families that may affect completion are needed. The causal effects of print-focused reading sessions are promising for addressing children’s print-concept knowledge but not alphabet knowledge. Home-based reading intervention has considerable social validity as a therapeutic approach.

Acknowledgments
We gratefully acknowledge the support provided by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant DC04933. We would like to thank all of the families and children who participated in this study as well as Anita Bailie and Elena Jones for their assistance with numerous aspects of this project.
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