Vocal Fold Mass Is Not A Useful Quantity for Describing F0 in Vocalization PurposeConfusion exists about the effect of mass and size of the vocal folds on fundamental frequency (F0) of phonation. In particular, greater vocal fold thickness is often assumed to be associated with lower F0. The purpose here is to show that such a relationship does not exist and that F0 ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   April 01, 2011
Vocal Fold Mass Is Not A Useful Quantity for Describing F0 in Vocalization
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ingo R. Titze
    National Center for Voice and Speech, University of Utah, Salt Lake City
    National Center for Voice and Speech, University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Correspondence to Ingo R. Titze: ingo.titze@ncvs2.org
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Jack Jiang
    Associate Editor: Jack Jiang×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Letter to the Editor   |   April 01, 2011
Vocal Fold Mass Is Not A Useful Quantity for Describing F0 in Vocalization
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2011, Vol. 54, 520-522. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0284)
History: Received September 7, 2001 , Accepted December 15, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2011, Vol. 54, 520-522. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0284)
History: Received September 7, 2001; Accepted December 15, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 19

PurposeConfusion exists about the effect of mass and size of the vocal folds on fundamental frequency (F0) of phonation. In particular, greater vocal fold thickness is often assumed to be associated with lower F0. The purpose here is to show that such a relationship does not exist and that F0 should be conceptualized with quantities other than mass (i.e., length and tissue stress).

MethodArguments are made on the basis of fundamental laws of mechanics (point-mass vs. distributed mass).

ConclusionIn speech science, phonetics, and animal vocalization disciplines, instruction should shift away from point-mass descriptions of vocal fold tissue and toward an understanding of mode frequencies in an elastic continuum.

Acknowledgment
Funding for this work was provided by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant 1R01 DC008612-01A1.
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