An Acoustic Study of the Relationships Among Neurologic Disease, Dysarthria Type, and Severity of Dysarthria PurposeThis study examined acoustic predictors of speech intelligibility in speakers with several types of dysarthria secondary to different diseases and conducted classification analysis solely by acoustic measures according to 3 variables (disease, speech severity, and dysarthria type).MethodSpeech recordings from 107 speakers with dysarthria due to Parkinson’s disease, stroke, traumatic brain ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2011
An Acoustic Study of the Relationships Among Neurologic Disease, Dysarthria Type, and Severity of Dysarthria
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yunjung Kim
    Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge
    Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge
  • Raymond D. Kent
    University of Wisconsin—Madison
    University of Wisconsin—Madison
  • Gary Weismer
    University of Wisconsin—Madison
    University of Wisconsin—Madison
  • Correspondence to Yunjung Kim: ykim6@lsu.edu
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Wolfram Ziegler
    Associate Editor: Wolfram Ziegler×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   April 01, 2011
An Acoustic Study of the Relationships Among Neurologic Disease, Dysarthria Type, and Severity of Dysarthria
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2011, Vol. 54, 417-429. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0020)
History: Received January 26, 2010 , Accepted August 30, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2011, Vol. 54, 417-429. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0020)
History: Received January 26, 2010; Accepted August 30, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 45

PurposeThis study examined acoustic predictors of speech intelligibility in speakers with several types of dysarthria secondary to different diseases and conducted classification analysis solely by acoustic measures according to 3 variables (disease, speech severity, and dysarthria type).

MethodSpeech recordings from 107 speakers with dysarthria due to Parkinson’s disease, stroke, traumatic brain injury, and multiple system atrophy were used for acoustic analysis and for perceptual judgment of speech intelligibility. Acoustic analysis included 8 segmental/suprasegmental features: 2nd formant frequency slope, articulation rate, voiceless interval duration, 1st moment analysis for fricatives, vowel space, F0, intensity range, and Pairwise Variability Index.

ResultsThe results showed that (a) acoustic predictors of speech intelligibility differed slightly across diseases and (b) classification accuracy by dysarthria type was typically worse than by disease type or severity.

ConclusionsThese findings were discussed with respect to (a) the relationship between acoustic characteristics and speech intelligibility and (b) dysarthria classification.

Acknowledgment
This study was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant DC00319 and 2006 New Century Scholarships from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation. We thank Joseph R. Duffy of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, for performing the dysarthria-type classifications used in this study.
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