Phonological Awareness in Deaf Children Who Use Cochlear Implants A short-term longitudinal study was conducted to investigate possible benefits of cochlear implant (CI) use on the development of phonological awareness in deaf children. Nineteen CI users were tested on 2 occasions. Two groups of deaf children using hearing aids were tested once: 11 profoundly deaf and 10 severely deaf ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2005
Phonological Awareness in Deaf Children Who Use Cochlear Implants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Deborah James
    University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
  • Kaukab Rajput
    Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London
  • Tracey Brown
    Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London
  • Tony Sirimanna
    Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London
  • Julie Brinton
    Southampton Cochlear Implant Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom
  • Usha Goswami
    University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: d.m.james@ncl.ac.uk
Article Information
Development / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2005
Phonological Awareness in Deaf Children Who Use Cochlear Implants
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2005, Vol. 48, 1511-1528. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/105)
History: Received April 5, 2004 , Revised October 15, 2004 , Accepted April 13, 2005
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2005, Vol. 48, 1511-1528. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/105)
History: Received April 5, 2004; Revised October 15, 2004; Accepted April 13, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 32

A short-term longitudinal study was conducted to investigate possible benefits of cochlear implant (CI) use on the development of phonological awareness in deaf children. Nineteen CI users were tested on 2 occasions. Two groups of deaf children using hearing aids were tested once: 11 profoundly deaf and 10 severely deaf children. A battery of tests was designed to investigate syllable, rhyme, and phoneme awareness. Syllable awareness in the CI users was equivalent to that of the severely deaf group, and rhyme and phoneme awareness was similar to that of the profoundly deaf children using hearing aids. CI use affords some benefit to the development of phonological awareness. The results from this study indicate that this enhancement is first observable at the syllable level.

Acknowledgments
Support for this research was provided by a Child Health Research Trust PhD studentship to Deborah James supervised by Usha Goswami. Research at the Institute of Child Health (London) and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (London) National Health Service (NHS) Trust benefits from research and development funding received from the NHS executive. We thank the clinicians at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children Cochlear Implant Programme and the South of England Cochlear Implant Centre at the University of Southampton. Valerie Hazan’s involvement is gratefully acknowledged. We are indebted to the teachers and speech and language therapists in the many communities in which we worked for their encouragement and support. Many thanks are due to the children and families who took part in this study.
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