The Onset of Tense Marking in Children at Risk for Specific Language Impairment Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate measures reflecting the onset of tense marking for children between the ages of 2;0 (years;months) and 3;0. Method: The validity of 4 cumulative measures of tense marker emergence and productivity was evaluated relative to existing measures of early grammatical ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2005
The Onset of Tense Marking in Children at Risk for Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Pamela A. Hadley
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb
  • Heather Short
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: phadley@niu.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2005
The Onset of Tense Marking in Children at Risk for Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2005, Vol. 48, 1344-1362. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/094)
History: Received July 22, 2004 , Accepted April 1, 2005
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2005, Vol. 48, 1344-1362. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/094)
History: Received July 22, 2004; Accepted April 1, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 38

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate measures reflecting the onset of tense marking for children between the ages of 2;0 (years;months) and 3;0.

Method: The validity of 4 cumulative measures of tense marker emergence and productivity was evaluated relative to existing measures of early grammatical development in a sample of 20 children followed longitudinally. Fourteen children were at risk for specific language impairment (AR-SLI group), and 6 children had low average language abilities (LA group).

Results: All measures of onset were highly correlated with the traditional measures; however, children's progress toward mastery of grammatical tense marking was best explained by the productivity of their tense marking systems. Finally, the onset measures imposing productivity requirements best differentiated children in the LA group from those in the AR-SLI group.

Conclusions: The clinical implications for using the late onset of tense marking to improve the early identification of SLI are discussed.

Acknowledgments
Support for this work was provided by a grant (R03DC04641) from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, awarded to the first author. Portions of this article were previously presented at the 2002 International Congress for the Study of Child Language/ Symposium for Research on Child Language Disorders in Madison, WI, and at the 2003 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association convention in Chicago. Several research assistants deserve recognition for their contributions to data collection, transcription, and/or analysis: Susan Hurd, Nicole Eklund, Cathy Agostinelli, Jennifer Beale, Jennifer Brinkmeier, Elizabeth Wlodzimierski, Cynthia Bryant, Jill Hoover, Lynette Leombruni, and Cheryl Beil. We are grateful to the speech– language pathologists and audiologists at the Northern Illinois University Speech-Language-Hearing Clinic for their professional contributions to diagnostic evaluations. Finally, we extend special thanks to the children and families for their faithful commitment to this longitudinal study.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access