Examination of Strength Training and Detraining Effects in Expiratory Muscles Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine strength gains following expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) and to determine detraining effects when the training stimulus is removed. Method: Thirty-two healthy participants were enrolled in an EMST program. Sixteen participants trained for 4 weeks (Group 1) and 16 participants trained ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2005
Examination of Strength Training and Detraining Effects in Expiratory Muscles
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Baker
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Paul Davenport
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Christine Sapienza
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: bakerse1@muohio.edu
Article Information
Special Populations / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2005
Examination of Strength Training and Detraining Effects in Expiratory Muscles
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2005, Vol. 48, 1325-1333. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/092)
History: Received July 15, 2004 , Revised December 18, 2004 , Accepted April 28, 2005
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2005, Vol. 48, 1325-1333. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/092)
History: Received July 15, 2004; Revised December 18, 2004; Accepted April 28, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 24

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine strength gains following expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) and to determine detraining effects when the training stimulus is removed.

Method: Thirty-two healthy participants were enrolled in an EMST program. Sixteen participants trained for 4 weeks (Group 1) and 16 participants trained for 8 weeks (Group 2). All 32 participants were detrained for 8 weeks. Maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) was used to document change in expiratory muscle strength throughout the study.

Results: Group 1 had a 41% increase and Group 2 had a 51% increase in MEP following the training. Mean MEP, for both groups, was significantly greater than baseline at the end of the training period (p = .0001), at the 4th week of detraining (p = .0001), and at the 8th week of detraining (p = .0001). The results also indicated that there was no significant difference in mean MEP between the groups at baseline, end of training, or throughout the detraining period (p = .960).

Discussion: The results suggest that expiratory muscle strength gains following a 4- and 8-week EMST program do not differ significantly. Additionally, detraining rates do not appear to be dependent on length of training time.

Acknowledgment
Funding for this project was provided by a Graduate Student Scholarship from the Florida Association of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists.
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