Utility of Clinical Swallowing Examination Measures for Detecting Aspiration Post-Stroke The purpose of this investigation was to determine the utility of clinical swallowing examination (CSE) measures for detecting aspiration as defined by videofluoroscopic swallowing examination (VFSE). This study, involving 165 participants, is a follow-up to a previously published investigation of 60 participants. Findings are compared with that investigation as well ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2005
Utility of Clinical Swallowing Examination Measures for Detecting Aspiration Post-Stroke
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • G. H. McCullough
    University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock
  • J. C. Rosenbek
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • R. T. Wertz
    Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, and Department of Veterans Affairs, Nashville, TN
  • S. McCoy
    Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, City, State, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN
  • G. Mann
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • K. McCullough
    University of Central Arkansas, Conway
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: mcculloughgaryh@uams.edu
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2005
Utility of Clinical Swallowing Examination Measures for Detecting Aspiration Post-Stroke
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2005, Vol. 48, 1280-1293. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/089)
History: Received May 6, 2004 , Accepted April 13, 2005
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2005, Vol. 48, 1280-1293. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/089)
History: Received May 6, 2004; Accepted April 13, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 54

The purpose of this investigation was to determine the utility of clinical swallowing examination (CSE) measures for detecting aspiration as defined by videofluoroscopic swallowing examination (VFSE). This study, involving 165 participants, is a follow-up to a previously published investigation of 60 participants. Findings are compared with that investigation as well as with other research on CSEs. The results suggest that clinicians can make an accurate judgment of the occurrence of aspiration in most poststroke patients. However, ruling out aspiration when it is absent appears more problematic. More work needs to be done if data collected from noninstrumented examinations are to be strongly predictive of the presence and absence of aspiration on VFSE. At present, there are no data to suggest that CSEs can be used to quantify aspiration or make adequate recommendations regarding patient care.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a grant (C96-1143RA) from the Department of Veterans Affairs, Rehabilitation Research and Development Program.
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