Re: Law, Garrett, and Nye (2004a). "The Efficacy of Treatment for Children With Developmental Speech and Language Delay/Disorder: A Meta-Analysis" The current emphasis on evidence-based practice is an important renewal of clinicians’ commitment to the link between research and practice. From their inception, our professions have placed high value on the application of research findings. This is not new. What is new about evidence-based practice is that clinicians are ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   October 01, 2005
Re: Law, Garrett, and Nye (2004a). "The Efficacy of Treatment for Children With Developmental Speech and Language Delay/Disorder: A Meta-Analysis"
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Judith R. Johnston
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: jrj@audiospeech.ubc.ca
Article Information
Special Populations / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Language Disorders / Language / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   October 01, 2005
Re: Law, Garrett, and Nye (2004a). "The Efficacy of Treatment for Children With Developmental Speech and Language Delay/Disorder: A Meta-Analysis"
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2005, Vol. 48, 1114-1117. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/077)
History: Received May 20, 2005 , Accepted July 6, 2005
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2005, Vol. 48, 1114-1117. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/077)
History: Received May 20, 2005; Accepted July 6, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 11
The current emphasis on evidence-based practice is an important renewal of clinicians’ commitment to the link between research and practice. From their inception, our professions have placed high value on the application of research findings. This is not new. What is new about evidence-based practice is that clinicians are now challenged to be better informed about scientific process, to read more systematically, and to weigh bodies of evidence. Given the scope of our practice, these are daunting tasks. Like many clinicians, I make a point of reading review articles to keep abreast of the literature, and I generally find them useful. The meta-analysis recently published by Law, Garrett, and Nye (2004a), however, concerns me on several counts.
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