Multiple Looks in Speech Sound Discrimination in Adults N. F. Viemeister and G. H. Wakefield's (1991) multiple looks hypothesis is a theoretical approach from the psychoacoustic literature that has promise for bridging the gap between results from speech perception research and results from psychoacoustic research. This hypothesis accounts for sensory detection data and predicts that if the "looks" ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2005
Multiple Looks in Speech Sound Discrimination in Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rachael Frush Holt
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Arlene Earley Carney
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: raholt@indiana.edu
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2005
Multiple Looks in Speech Sound Discrimination in Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2005, Vol. 48, 922-943. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/064)
History: Received January 26, 2004 , Accepted December 16, 2004
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2005, Vol. 48, 922-943. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/064)
History: Received January 26, 2004; Accepted December 16, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 17

N. F. Viemeister and G. H. Wakefield's (1991) multiple looks hypothesis is a theoretical approach from the psychoacoustic literature that has promise for bridging the gap between results from speech perception research and results from psychoacoustic research. This hypothesis accounts for sensory detection data and predicts that if the "looks" at a stimulus are independent and information is combined optimally, sensitivity should increase for 2 pulses relative to 1 pulse. Specifically, d' (a bias-free measure of sensitivity) for 2 pulses should be larger than d' for 1 pulse. One speech discrimination paradigm that presents stimuli with multiple presentations is the change/no-change procedure. On a change trial, the standard and comparison stimuli differ; on a no-change trial, they are the same. Normal-hearing adults were tested using the change/no-change procedure with 3 consonant-vowel minimal pairs in combinations of 1, 2, and 4 repetitions of standard and comparison stimuli at various signal-to-noise ratios. If multiple looks extend to this procedure, performance should increase with higher repetition numbers. Performance increased with more presentations of the speech contrasts tested. The multiple looks hypothesis predicted performance better at low repetition numbers when performance was near d' values of 1.0 than at higher repetition numbers and higher performance levels.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a National Research Service Award predoctoral fellowship from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (Grant F31 DC05919) and by the 2002 Student Research Grant in Audiology from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation. Preliminary findings were presented at the 2002 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association annual convention (Atlanta, GA) and the 2004 Acoustical Society of America annual meeting (New York, NY). We thank Edward Carney for his assistance in computer programming and data analysis; Benjamin Munson for his assistance in synthesizing the stimuli; Peggy Nelson, Robert Schlauch, Karlind Moller, and Neal Viemeister for their valuable insights on this project; and Karen Iler Kirk, David Pisoni, and Tim Green for helpful comments on earlier versions of this article.
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