Exploring the Processing Continuum of Single-Word Comprehension in Aphasia This study investigated the vulnerability of lexical processing in individuals with aphasia. Though classical teaching of aphasia syndromes holds that people with Broca's aphasia have intact comprehension at the single-word level, the nature and extent of this purported sparing were explored under suboptimal processing conditions. A combination of acoustic distortions ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2005
Exploring the Processing Continuum of Single-Word Comprehension in Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Suzanne Moineau
    Center for Research in Language, University of California, San Diego
  • Nina F. Dronkers
    Center for Research in Language, University of California, San Diego; VA Northern California Health Care System; and University of California, Davis
  • Elizabeth Bates
    Center for Research in Language and Department of Cognitive Science, University of California, San Diego
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: smoineau@crl.ucsd.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2005
Exploring the Processing Continuum of Single-Word Comprehension in Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2005, Vol. 48, 884-896. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/061)
History: Received June 27, 2003 , Accepted November 16, 2004
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2005, Vol. 48, 884-896. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/061)
History: Received June 27, 2003; Accepted November 16, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 41

This study investigated the vulnerability of lexical processing in individuals with aphasia. Though classical teaching of aphasia syndromes holds that people with Broca's aphasia have intact comprehension at the single-word level, the nature and extent of this purported sparing were explored under suboptimal processing conditions. A combination of acoustic distortions (low-pass filtering and time compression) was used to probe for "break points" in lexical comprehension in a group of individuals with aphasia. Results suggest that accurate and efficient lexical processing is vulnerable to suboptimal listening climates, and that processing under these conditions reveals the continuous nature of the impairment of linguistic behaviors observed in individuals with aphasia.

Acknowledgments
This research was presented, in part, as an invited talk at the Graduate Student Presents Forum at the 2002 Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society. We would like to thank Robert Buffington, Carl Ludy, and Ayse Saygin for technical support, helpful comments, and/or assistance with testing. Support for this research came from a training grant from the Center for Research in Language at the University of California, San Diego, and from Grant NIH/NIDCD 2RO1 DC00216 awarded to Elizabeth Bates.
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