Roles of Initiation and Responsiveness in Access and Participation for Children With Specific Language Impairment This study compared the abilities of children with specific language impairment (SLI; n=10) and typically developing (TD) children (n=13) to access and participate in an ongoing interaction between two unfamiliar peer partners. Results revealed that all children in the study accessed by either making an unprompted initiation toward their peers ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2005
Roles of Initiation and Responsiveness in Access and Participation for Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Colleen A. Liiva
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • Patricia L. Cleave
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2005
Roles of Initiation and Responsiveness in Access and Participation for Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2005, Vol. 48, 868-883. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/060)
History: Received May 11, 2004 , Revised November 12, 2004 , Accepted December 28, 2004
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2005, Vol. 48, 868-883. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/060)
History: Received May 11, 2004; Revised November 12, 2004; Accepted December 28, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 21

This study compared the abilities of children with specific language impairment (SLI; n=10) and typically developing (TD) children (n=13) to access and participate in an ongoing interaction between two unfamiliar peer partners. Results revealed that all children in the study accessed by either making an unprompted initiation toward their peers (access initiation) or by responding to a question or play invitation directed toward them (access response). However, 4 children with SLI were unsuccessful in achieving successful access initiation during the 10-min play period. Children with SLI required a longer period of time to achieve access initiation. Following access, children with SLI were addressed significantly less by their play partners, participated in less group play, and engaged in more individual play and onlooking behavior. Among the SLI group, language levels were negatively related to the time children required to achieve their first successful access and first access initiation. Expressive language levels were positively related to the percentage of utterances children produced postaccess and the percentage of utterances they were addressed postaccess by their play partners. Differences in receptive skills among SLI children were less strongly related to the time they required in achieving their first access and were unrelated to their ability to participate in the interaction.

Acknowledgments
This research was generously supported by a grant from the Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation.
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