A Subtype of Speech Delay Associated With Developmental Psychosocial Involvement This report presents findings supporting the hypothesis of a clinically relevant subtype of childhood speech sound disorder, provisionally titled speech delay—developmental psychosocial involvement (SD-DPI). Conversational speech samples from 29 children who met inclusionary criteria for SD-DPI were selected from a case record archive at a university speech clinic for children. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2005
A Subtype of Speech Delay Associated With Developmental Psychosocial Involvement
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katherina K. Y. Hauner
    Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin—Madison
  • Lawrence D. Shriberg
    Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin—Madison
  • Joan Kwiatkowski
    Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin—Madison
  • Chad T. Allen
    Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin—Madison
  • Contact author: Lawrence D. Shriberg, Phonology Project, Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin—Madison, 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705. E-mail: shriberg@waisman.wisc.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2005
A Subtype of Speech Delay Associated With Developmental Psychosocial Involvement
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2005, Vol. 48, 635-650. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/044)
History: Received June 23, 2004 , Accepted November 30, 2004
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2005, Vol. 48, 635-650. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/044)
History: Received June 23, 2004; Accepted November 30, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 12

This report presents findings supporting the hypothesis of a clinically relevant subtype of childhood speech sound disorder, provisionally titled speech delay—developmental psychosocial involvement (SD-DPI). Conversational speech samples from 29 children who met inclusionary criteria for SD-DPI were selected from a case record archive at a university speech clinic for children. Participants with SD-DPI had been characterized by speech clinicians and caregivers as having speech delay with psychosocial issues that required attention in the course of at least 1 semester of speech treatment. The 29 participants were divided into 2 subgroups, based on clinicians' and parents' records indicating either approach-related negative affect (n=23) or withdrawal-related negative affect (n=6). Each participant with SD-DPI was matched by age, gender, and type of speech involvement to 3 comparison speakers with speech delay of unknown origin (n=87). Analyses of the conversational speech samples indicated that in comparison with participants in the control group, those with SD-DPI had significantly more severe speech delay, averaging approximately 7% to 10% lowered speech competence in conversation. The clinical prevalence of SD-DPI was estimated at approximately 12% of children referred to the university speech clinic in the present study. The authors interpret the present findings to indicate that approach-related or withdrawal-related negative affect, negative emotionality or mood, and decreased task persistence or attention are risk factors for increased severity of expression of speech delay.

Acknowledgments
Sincere thanks to our laboratory colleagues at the University of Wisconsin—Madison for their assistance and contributions at various stages of this project, including Roger Brown, Catherine Coffey, Sheryl Hall, Heather Karlsson, Yunjung Kim, Jane McSweeny, Carmen Rasmussen, Alison Scheer, Christie Tilkens, and David Wilson. This research is supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant DC000496.
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