Intensive Stuttering Modification Therapy A Multidimensional Assessment of Treatment Outcomes Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2005
Intensive Stuttering Modification Therapy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael Blomgren
    The University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Nelson Roy
    The University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Thomas Callister
    The University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Ray M. Merrill
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Contact author: Michael Blomgren, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The University of Utah, 390 S. 1530 E., Room 1201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0252. E-mail: michael.blomgren@health.utah.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2005
Intensive Stuttering Modification Therapy
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2005, Vol. 48, 509-523. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/035)
History: Received February 23, 2004 , Revised August 20, 2004 , Accepted October 11, 2004
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2005, Vol. 48, 509-523. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2005/035)
History: Received February 23, 2004; Revised August 20, 2004; Accepted October 11, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 37

Nineteen adults who stutter participated in a 3-week intensive stuttering modification treatment program (the Successful Stuttering Management Program [SSMP]). A series of 14 fluency and affective-based measures were assessed before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 6 months after treatment. Measures included stuttering frequency; the Stuttering Severity Instrument for Children and Adults, Third Edition (SSI-3); a self-rating of stuttering severity; the Perceptions of Stuttering Inventory (PSI); the Locus of Control of Behavior Scale; the Beck Depression Inventory; the Multicomponent Anxiety Inventory IV (MCAI-IV); and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Statistically significant improvements were observed on 4 of the total 14 measures immediately following treatment and on 4 measures at 6 months posttreatment. Statistically significant improvements observed immediately posttreatment included scores on the SSI and the Struggle, Avoidance, and Expectancy subscales of the PSI. Sustained statistically significant improvements at 6 months posttreatment were observed only on client-reported perceptions of stuttering (the Avoidance and Expectancy subscales of the PSI) and 2 specific affective functioning measures (the Psychic and Somatic Anxiety subscales of the MCAI-IV). The SSMP generated some anxiolytic effects but was ineffective in producing durable reductions of core stuttering behaviors, such as stuttering frequency and severity. The discussion focuses on the strengths, weaknesses, and durability of the SSMP treatment approach.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a generous grant from David E. Simmons, president of the Simmons Media Group. We thank all the participants who volunteered their time to sit for the recordings and to fill out the many questionnaires. We also express our gratitude to Dr. Dorvan Breitenfeldt and Mr. Tom Gurrister, the clinical supervisors of the SSMP, who allowed us to objectively evaluate their approach. We offer a special thanks to Dr. Sean Redmond for his insightful comments during all stages of the study. A portion of this research was undertaken as fulfillment of the master of science degree completed by T. Callister. Parts of this research were presented at the 4th World Congress on Fluency Disorders, Montreal, Canada, 2003.
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